2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158986
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Osteoporosis Prevention in Men 50 Years of Age and Older
Abstract:
Osteoporosis Prevention in Men 50 Years of Age and Older
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sedlak, Carol, PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:M. A. Doheny and R. Zeller, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Ohio, OH
Gender bias against men in osteoporosis research is comparable to previous bias against women in cardiac research. By the year 2025, it is projected that men will have a rate of hip fracture similar to that for women. This descriptive study based on the Revised Health Belief Model (RHBM) was designed to examine the relationships among knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs (susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, motivation, self-efficacy), and osteoporosis preventing behaviors (OPB) including calcium intake, weight bearing exercise, and smoking in men >50 years of age. A community based convenience sample of 226 men, ages 50-93 years completed a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan & Gendler, 1991), Osteoporosis Smoking Health Belief Instrument (OSHB), Dietary Calcium Rapid Assessment Intake (RAM), and Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). Research questions were: 1) Is there a relationship between knowledge of osteoporosis and RHBM variables? 2) Is there a relationship between knowledge and reported osteoporosis prevention behaviors? 3) Is there a relationship between health beliefs with reported osteoporosis prevention behaviors? Findings revealed the following significant relationships. Knowledge was related with all RHBM variables except seriousness. The significant relationships were susceptibility, r=-.155, p=.020; benefits of exercise, r=.455, p=.000; benefits of calcium, r=.318, p=.000; barriers to exercise, r=-.277, p=.000; barriers to calcium, r=-.362, p=;.000; motivation, .r=.312, p=.000; self-efficacy for exercise, r=.247, p=.000 , and self-efficacy for calcium, r=.262, p=.000. There was a marginally significant positive correlation between knowledge and calcium intake (r = .117; p= .078) and a significant positive correlation with the sum of the weight bearing activity (r=.139, p=.039). Only 13 of the men reported smoking either cigarettes and/or cigars, however, there was a suggestive but non-significant association between total knowledge and smoking. These outcomes may assist health care providers in the development of more effective interventions to increase OPBs in men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOsteoporosis Prevention in Men 50 Years of Age and Olderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158986-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Osteoporosis Prevention in Men 50 Years of Age and Older</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sedlak, Carol, PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csedlak@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. A. Doheny and R. Zeller, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Ohio, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Gender bias against men in osteoporosis research is comparable to previous bias against women in cardiac research. By the year 2025, it is projected that men will have a rate of hip fracture similar to that for women. This descriptive study based on the Revised Health Belief Model (RHBM) was designed to examine the relationships among knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs (susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, motivation, self-efficacy), and osteoporosis preventing behaviors (OPB) including calcium intake, weight bearing exercise, and smoking in men &gt;50 years of age. A community based convenience sample of 226 men, ages 50-93 years completed a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan &amp; Gendler, 1991), Osteoporosis Smoking Health Belief Instrument (OSHB), Dietary Calcium Rapid Assessment Intake (RAM), and Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). Research questions were: 1) Is there a relationship between knowledge of osteoporosis and RHBM variables? 2) Is there a relationship between knowledge and reported osteoporosis prevention behaviors? 3) Is there a relationship between health beliefs with reported osteoporosis prevention behaviors? Findings revealed the following significant relationships. Knowledge was related with all RHBM variables except seriousness. The significant relationships were susceptibility, r=-.155, p=.020; benefits of exercise, r=.455, p=.000; benefits of calcium, r=.318, p=.000; barriers to exercise, r=-.277, p=.000; barriers to calcium, r=-.362, p=;.000; motivation, .r=.312, p=.000; self-efficacy for exercise, r=.247, p=.000 , and self-efficacy for calcium, r=.262, p=.000. There was a marginally significant positive correlation between knowledge and calcium intake (r = .117; p= .078) and a significant positive correlation with the sum of the weight bearing activity (r=.139, p=.039). Only 13 of the men reported smoking either cigarettes and/or cigars, however, there was a suggestive but non-significant association between total knowledge and smoking. These outcomes may assist health care providers in the development of more effective interventions to increase OPBs in men.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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