2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Self-Reported Physical Activity In Children Ages 10-12
Abstract:
Factors Affecting Self-Reported Physical Activity In Children Ages 10-12
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sherrick-Escamilla, Shirley, PhD (C)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Contact Address:, Detroit, MI, 48228, USA
This study examined the relationship between the current level of physical activity in older school-age children and their self-perception of what promotes and hinders their participation in physical activity; and how well Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) predicted older school-age children's current level of physical activity. One hundred fifty one 10, 11, and 12 year old children from 7 Roman Catholic K-8th grade and 1 Charter K-8th grade schools in a urban southwest portion of Michigan participated in the study during the academic year 2005/2006.The study revealed that personal factors gender and body mass index (BMI) and behavior-specific cognitions and affect factors perceived physical activity self-efficacy were not significant predictors of the self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score). The study also revealed that the self-reported perceived benefits to participate in physical activity composite scores accounted for 58% (p < .01) of the variance explained in self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score); and the self-reported perceived barriers to participate in physical activity composite scores accounted for 49% of the variance (p < .01) explained in self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score). To determine if Pender's HPM predicted the self-reported total current level of physical activity (Total MET Score) path analysis was performed and revealed a significant inverse relationship between self-reported perceived physical activity self-efficacy composite scores and self-reported perceived barriers to participate in physical activity composite scores (p < .01). This supports Pender's theoretical proposition "greater perceived self-efficacy results in fewer perceived barriers to a specific health behavior." This study will assist the researcher in implementing a quasi-experimental time series intervention study for the K-8th grade schools utilized in the study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Self-Reported Physical Activity In Children Ages 10-12en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158987-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Affecting Self-Reported Physical Activity In Children Ages 10-12</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sherrick-Escamilla, Shirley, PhD (C)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Detroit, MI, 48228, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheescsa@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined the relationship between the current level of physical activity in older school-age children and their self-perception of what promotes and hinders their participation in physical activity; and how well Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) predicted older school-age children's current level of physical activity. One hundred fifty one 10, 11, and 12 year old children from 7 Roman Catholic K-8th grade and 1 Charter K-8th grade schools in a urban southwest portion of Michigan participated in the study during the academic year 2005/2006.The study revealed that personal factors gender and body mass index (BMI) and behavior-specific cognitions and affect factors perceived physical activity self-efficacy were not significant predictors of the self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score). The study also revealed that the self-reported perceived benefits to participate in physical activity composite scores accounted for 58% (p &lt; .01) of the variance explained in self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score); and the self-reported perceived barriers to participate in physical activity composite scores accounted for 49% of the variance (p &lt; .01) explained in self-reported total current level of physical activity in older school-age children (Total MET Score). To determine if Pender's HPM predicted the self-reported total current level of physical activity (Total MET Score) path analysis was performed and revealed a significant inverse relationship between self-reported perceived physical activity self-efficacy composite scores and self-reported perceived barriers to participate in physical activity composite scores (p &lt; .01). This supports Pender's theoretical proposition &quot;greater perceived self-efficacy results in fewer perceived barriers to a specific health behavior.&quot; This study will assist the researcher in implementing a quasi-experimental time series intervention study for the K-8th grade schools utilized in the study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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