2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158990
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Latino Children/Parent Dyads Report of Dietary Intake and Physical Activity
Abstract:
Latino Children/Parent Dyads Report of Dietary Intake and Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Snethen, Julia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Kenosha, WI, 53142, USA
Co-Authors:J.B. Hewitt and L.E. Rodriquez-Burnett, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; A.C. Snyder, Human Movement Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; D.H. Petering, College of Letters and Sciences, Universit
Background: Childhood overweight in the US disproportionately affects Latino youth. Understanding Latino children's nutritional intake and physical activities must include communicating with children and families about their perceptions. The primary purpose of this study was to describe eating behaviors, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors of Latino children ages 10-12, based on children and parents' reports. Methods: Participants for this cross-sectional pilot study were parent-child dyads from two adjacent Midwestern Latino communities. Data were collected in the language preferred by participants. Children's self-reports were cross-classified with their parents' report of the child's behavior (n = 39) or against the parents' own behaviors (n = 14). Children's reported behaviors were examined in relation to age-and-gender body mass index [BMI] norms. Findings: Nineteen girls and 34 boys participated in the investigation; 22% born in Mexico, 4 in Puerto Rico, with the remainder in the US. 24.5% of the children were 'at risk,' and 50.1% were 'overweight' based on CDC criteria. A majority of children reported fruit, vegetable, and milk consumption below recommended dietary intake levels, and their health as "good to excellent," while 14.8% reported their health as poor. Fast food consumption was associated with a two-fold increased risk of being at or above the 85th percentile for age and gender (n =39). Based on national recommendations, only one in four children in our study walked to school daily, 19% attended physical education five days in an average week, and 58.5% watched television 2 hours per day or less. Anecdotally, parents reported they encouraged their children to drink fruit juice, including sugar based fruit drinks, and whole milk as they understood it was "very healthy" for their children. Conclusions: Discrepancies between national norms and participants' behavior and children's BMI in this study were identified. Participants reported limited fast food intake, viewing it as a "special treat." The study findings suggest these children may not be receiving adequate nutritional intake, nor achieving a balance between caloric intake and physical activity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLatino Children/Parent Dyads Report of Dietary Intake and Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158990-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Latino Children/Parent Dyads Report of Dietary Intake and Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snethen, Julia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Kenosha, WI, 53142, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">julia@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.B. Hewitt and L.E. Rodriquez-Burnett, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; A.C. Snyder, Human Movement Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; D.H. Petering, College of Letters and Sciences, Universit</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Childhood overweight in the US disproportionately affects Latino youth. Understanding Latino children's nutritional intake and physical activities must include communicating with children and families about their perceptions. The primary purpose of this study was to describe eating behaviors, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors of Latino children ages 10-12, based on children and parents' reports. Methods: Participants for this cross-sectional pilot study were parent-child dyads from two adjacent Midwestern Latino communities. Data were collected in the language preferred by participants. Children's self-reports were cross-classified with their parents' report of the child's behavior (n = 39) or against the parents' own behaviors (n = 14). Children's reported behaviors were examined in relation to age-and-gender body mass index [BMI] norms. Findings: Nineteen girls and 34 boys participated in the investigation; 22% born in Mexico, 4 in Puerto Rico, with the remainder in the US. 24.5% of the children were 'at risk,' and 50.1% were 'overweight' based on CDC criteria. A majority of children reported fruit, vegetable, and milk consumption below recommended dietary intake levels, and their health as &quot;good to excellent,&quot; while 14.8% reported their health as poor. Fast food consumption was associated with a two-fold increased risk of being at or above the 85th percentile for age and gender (n =39). Based on national recommendations, only one in four children in our study walked to school daily, 19% attended physical education five days in an average week, and 58.5% watched television 2 hours per day or less. Anecdotally, parents reported they encouraged their children to drink fruit juice, including sugar based fruit drinks, and whole milk as they understood it was &quot;very healthy&quot; for their children. Conclusions: Discrepancies between national norms and participants' behavior and children's BMI in this study were identified. Participants reported limited fast food intake, viewing it as a &quot;special treat.&quot; The study findings suggest these children may not be receiving adequate nutritional intake, nor achieving a balance between caloric intake and physical activity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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