A Cluster of Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risky Driving Behaviors in Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158991
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Cluster of Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risky Driving Behaviors in Young Adults
Abstract:
A Cluster of Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risky Driving Behaviors in Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA
Co-Authors:J.D. Fargo, Psychology, Utah State University, Logan, UT; M. Lyons, Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; and S.R. Howe, Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and level of association of a cluster of health-compromising behaviors in the young-adult emergency department (ED) population. Theoretical Perspective: The study builds on a theoretical model that describes the precursors, mediators, and consequences of health-compromising behaviors in young adulthood, with a particular focus on risky driving behaviors. Background: Vehicular injury is the leading cause of death in young adults. Although it remains controversial and perhaps paradoxical, the concept of providing injury prevention services in the ED setting is increasingly supported. Methods: The setting was an urban ED in a Level I Trauma Center with 85,000 patient visits per year. Using probability sampling, we screened 3,886 young adults, 18 to 44 years of age (50.3% male; 49.3 female; 53.2% Black; 41.1% White), to determine the prevalence of three health compromising behaviors that may lead to vehicular injury: risky driving (illegal or dangerous driving activities such as speeding and lack of seat belt use), sleep deficit (sleeping less than 7 hours/night), and problem drinking (drinking more than recommended drinking limits). Results: Of the total sample, 1,047 individuals met criteria for risky driving only, 442 met criteria for problem drinking only, and 574 met criteria for both risky driving and problem drinking. The participants had a mean of 14.12 nights/month that they slept less than 7 hours. A series of three independent-samples t-tests indicated that individuals who met criteria for risky driving or a combination of risky driving and problem drinking reported more nights of less than 7 hours of sleep than those who did not meet criteria for membership in these groups (both p < .05). However, there was no difference in amount of self-reported sleep between those identified and not identified as problem drinkers. Conclusions: Health-compromising behaviors in young adults occur in clusters. Sleep deficit may be an important behavior related to risky driving behaviors and an area that warrants further investigation. Implications: There is a significant need in the ED to offer interventions to prevent a cluster of health-compromising behaviors that may lead to injury.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Cluster of Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risky Driving Behaviors in Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158991-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Cluster of Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risky Driving Behaviors in Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssommer@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.D. Fargo, Psychology, Utah State University, Logan, UT; M. Lyons, Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; and S.R. Howe, Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and level of association of a cluster of health-compromising behaviors in the young-adult emergency department (ED) population. Theoretical Perspective: The study builds on a theoretical model that describes the precursors, mediators, and consequences of health-compromising behaviors in young adulthood, with a particular focus on risky driving behaviors. Background: Vehicular injury is the leading cause of death in young adults. Although it remains controversial and perhaps paradoxical, the concept of providing injury prevention services in the ED setting is increasingly supported. Methods: The setting was an urban ED in a Level I Trauma Center with 85,000 patient visits per year. Using probability sampling, we screened 3,886 young adults, 18 to 44 years of age (50.3% male; 49.3 female; 53.2% Black; 41.1% White), to determine the prevalence of three health compromising behaviors that may lead to vehicular injury: risky driving (illegal or dangerous driving activities such as speeding and lack of seat belt use), sleep deficit (sleeping less than 7 hours/night), and problem drinking (drinking more than recommended drinking limits). Results: Of the total sample, 1,047 individuals met criteria for risky driving only, 442 met criteria for problem drinking only, and 574 met criteria for both risky driving and problem drinking. The participants had a mean of 14.12 nights/month that they slept less than 7 hours. A series of three independent-samples t-tests indicated that individuals who met criteria for risky driving or a combination of risky driving and problem drinking reported more nights of less than 7 hours of sleep than those who did not meet criteria for membership in these groups (both p &lt; .05). However, there was no difference in amount of self-reported sleep between those identified and not identified as problem drinkers. Conclusions: Health-compromising behaviors in young adults occur in clusters. Sleep deficit may be an important behavior related to risky driving behaviors and an area that warrants further investigation. Implications: There is a significant need in the ED to offer interventions to prevent a cluster of health-compromising behaviors that may lead to injury.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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