2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158992
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Systematic Review of Studies on Nursing Education Outcomes
Abstract:
Systematic Review of Studies on Nursing Education Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Spector, Nancy, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:NCSBN
Contact Address:Education, Chicago, IL, 60601, USA
Background: Boards of nursing are mandated to approve nursing programs, so regulators need evidence to address minimum educational standards that are fair and consistent across programs. Moreover, in this time of faculty and nurse shortages, legislators are asking regulatory bodies for evidence to support their rules and regulations. Therefore the National Council of State Boards of Nursing conducted a systematic review of all studies of nursing education outcomes as part of a process for identifying evidence-based nursing education. Methodology: A modified Cochrane technique was used as the design: 1) The studies were categorized for strength of design: Level I (randomized control trial, systematic review, meta-analysis), II (quasi-experimental, correlational, descriptive, survey, evaluation, and qualitative), and III (expert opinion or consensus statements); 2) Databases used to retrieve studies between 1965 - 2005 included: CINAHL, Medline, and Eric; 3) Specific keywords were: education, nursing, teaching, education research, learning methods, learning strategies, research-based education, and outcomes of education; 4) Inclusion criteria were specified; and 5) Inter-rater reliability was assessed. Sample: 25 studies identified; 3 were Level I and 22 were Level II. Results: The following teaching strategies were supported by this review: 1) Deliberate practice; 2) Supervision by qualified faculty who provide feedback and opportunities for reflective practice; 3) Clinical experiences with actual patients; 4) Collaboration with interdisciplinary teams; 5) Opportunities to gain confidence, build relationships, and develop critical thinking; 6) Online and simulated strategies are a valuable adjunct. Conclusions: This is the first systematic review to study outcomes in nursing education. Better learning outcomes occur when students are supervised by a qualified faculty, and this suggests further research into faculty qualifications. With current faculty and nursing shortages, some programs have radically decreased clinical experiences with patients, and this study does not support that trend. This evidence supports online, simulated, and interdisciplinary learning experiences and suggests that these areas be further researched.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSystematic Review of Studies on Nursing Education Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158992-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Systematic Review of Studies on Nursing Education Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spector, Nancy, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">NCSBN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Education, Chicago, IL, 60601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nspector@ncsbn.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Boards of nursing are mandated to approve nursing programs, so regulators need evidence to address minimum educational standards that are fair and consistent across programs. Moreover, in this time of faculty and nurse shortages, legislators are asking regulatory bodies for evidence to support their rules and regulations. Therefore the National Council of State Boards of Nursing conducted a systematic review of all studies of nursing education outcomes as part of a process for identifying evidence-based nursing education. Methodology: A modified Cochrane technique was used as the design: 1) The studies were categorized for strength of design: Level I (randomized control trial, systematic review, meta-analysis), II (quasi-experimental, correlational, descriptive, survey, evaluation, and qualitative), and III (expert opinion or consensus statements); 2) Databases used to retrieve studies between 1965 - 2005 included: CINAHL, Medline, and Eric; 3) Specific keywords were: education, nursing, teaching, education research, learning methods, learning strategies, research-based education, and outcomes of education; 4) Inclusion criteria were specified; and 5) Inter-rater reliability was assessed. Sample: 25 studies identified; 3 were Level I and 22 were Level II. Results: The following teaching strategies were supported by this review: 1) Deliberate practice; 2) Supervision by qualified faculty who provide feedback and opportunities for reflective practice; 3) Clinical experiences with actual patients; 4) Collaboration with interdisciplinary teams; 5) Opportunities to gain confidence, build relationships, and develop critical thinking; 6) Online and simulated strategies are a valuable adjunct. Conclusions: This is the first systematic review to study outcomes in nursing education. Better learning outcomes occur when students are supervised by a qualified faculty, and this suggests further research into faculty qualifications. With current faculty and nursing shortages, some programs have radically decreased clinical experiences with patients, and this study does not support that trend. This evidence supports online, simulated, and interdisciplinary learning experiences and suggests that these areas be further researched.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.