2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158993
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Fibromyalgia Pain and Anxiety
Abstract:
The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Fibromyalgia Pain and Anxiety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Stiller, Cate, PhD, Nursing
P.I. Institution Name:Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
Contact Address:Nursing, Erie, PA, 16509, USA
Most persons with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) experience uncontrolled pain. The currently used combination of treatments for FS pain, which include medications, exercise, and stress reduction, has been only moderately effective. Therapeutic touch (TT) is one therapy used by those with FS. Using Rogers' model, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on FS pain and anxiety. A randomized, pretest-posttest, crossover design was used. Forty-two of 46 persons with FS pain completed this study. Participants were randomly assigned to two different sequencing of interventions: 1) TT followed by the placebo or 2) the placebo followed by TT. The Krieger-Kunz TT method was used. A mattress pad was used as the placebo intervention. Pretreatment and posttreatment measures of pain (visual analogue scale), tender point pain threshold (pressure gauge algometry), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were obtained. Measures of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activation including blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate were also obtained. A univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test each of the hypotheses. During the TT condition participants experienced greater reduction in pain (p =.001), and anxiety (p < .001) than during the placebo condition. No significant differences were found in pulse, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate; pressure pain threshold at five paired tender point sites typically found in those with FS; and two control points. These findings provided mixed support for the assertions in Rogers' theory. The most important recommendation for nursing is that nurses can help their FS patients manage their pain and anxiety by recommending TT as an effective therapy. Nurses can also pursue education and training in using the Krieger-Kunz method of TT so they can administer TT in inpatient and outpatient settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Fibromyalgia Pain and Anxietyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158993-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Fibromyalgia Pain and Anxiety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stiller, Cate, PhD, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Edinboro University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Erie, PA, 16509, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catestiller@adelphia.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most persons with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) experience uncontrolled pain. The currently used combination of treatments for FS pain, which include medications, exercise, and stress reduction, has been only moderately effective. Therapeutic touch (TT) is one therapy used by those with FS. Using Rogers' model, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on FS pain and anxiety. A randomized, pretest-posttest, crossover design was used. Forty-two of 46 persons with FS pain completed this study. Participants were randomly assigned to two different sequencing of interventions: 1) TT followed by the placebo or 2) the placebo followed by TT. The Krieger-Kunz TT method was used. A mattress pad was used as the placebo intervention. Pretreatment and posttreatment measures of pain (visual analogue scale), tender point pain threshold (pressure gauge algometry), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were obtained. Measures of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activation including blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate were also obtained. A univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test each of the hypotheses. During the TT condition participants experienced greater reduction in pain (p =.001), and anxiety (p &lt; .001) than during the placebo condition. No significant differences were found in pulse, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate; pressure pain threshold at five paired tender point sites typically found in those with FS; and two control points. These findings provided mixed support for the assertions in Rogers' theory. The most important recommendation for nursing is that nurses can help their FS patients manage their pain and anxiety by recommending TT as an effective therapy. Nurses can also pursue education and training in using the Krieger-Kunz method of TT so they can administer TT in inpatient and outpatient settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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