Reducing Health Disparities Through Personalized E-Technology: Focus Groups With Urban Older Adults to Assess Feasibility, Phase One

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158999
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Health Disparities Through Personalized E-Technology: Focus Groups With Urban Older Adults to Assess Feasibility, Phase One
Abstract:
Reducing Health Disparities Through Personalized E-Technology: Focus Groups With Urban Older Adults to Assess Feasibility, Phase One
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Weglicki, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:Adult Health - 368 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:P. Jarosz, Adult Health, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI; J. Mendez & D. Ellis, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI; Y. Du, Library Sciences, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI & N. Awad and J. Tan, Business & Information Technology, Wayne State U
The United States is in the midst of a longevity explosion. Smoking and obesity are major risk factors contributing to heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic conditions accounting for over 60% of all deaths in older American adults. Racial and ethnic disparities exist for behavioral risk factors (e.g., tobacco use, physical activity, and eating); adopting healthy behaviors, such as smoke-free lifestyle or eating healthy, can reduce the risk of chronic diseases and early death among older adults. METHOD: This multidisciplinary study focuses on the feasibility of using personalized eHealthSmart«, an information technology (IT) program, by older adults with the aim of promoting healthy behaviors and reducing health disparities. Phase One, development of personalized e-technology education based on data from focus groups and survey analysis, targets ethnically and racially diverse urban elders living in the Midwest. The central thesis is that e-health promotion education is more effective when tailored to individuals. This community partnership, based on Green-Kreuter's PRECEDE-PROCEDE MODEL, targets senior centers where e-health education may be delivered. RESULTS: Thirty-five older adults participated in four focus group sessions; mean age was 69 years (SD=8.3), two-thirds were Black, single/divorced or widowed (62.5%), and most were educated (81% had high school degrees or some college). Eighty-four percent owned a computer; 63% used computers daily; 60% were "Comfortable" using computers; and 63% browsed the Internet routinely. Seventy-eight percent reported an interest in using e-technology to learn about health information; 87% for smoking cessation and 62% to lose weight. Focus group transcriptions were analyzed for e-program content themes for older adults (tobacco cessation and overweight/obesity) using NUD*IST and expert review. DISCUSSION: It is clear from Phase One findings that urban older adults have access, are comfortable, and willing to participate in educational programs that use e-health technology. The feasibility and efficacy of using IT to promote healthier lifestyles by older adults may result in reduced morbidity and mortality associated with unhealthy behaviors. Findings from Phase One will be used to test eHealthSmart«.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Health Disparities Through Personalized E-Technology: Focus Groups With Urban Older Adults to Assess Feasibility, Phase Oneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158999-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Health Disparities Through Personalized E-Technology: Focus Groups With Urban Older Adults to Assess Feasibility, Phase One</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weglicki, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health - 368 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ac3844@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Jarosz, Adult Health, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI; J. Mendez &amp; D. Ellis, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI; Y. Du, Library Sciences, Wayne State U., Detroit, MI &amp; N. Awad and J. Tan, Business &amp; Information Technology, Wayne State U</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The United States is in the midst of a longevity explosion. Smoking and obesity are major risk factors contributing to heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic conditions accounting for over 60% of all deaths in older American adults. Racial and ethnic disparities exist for behavioral risk factors (e.g., tobacco use, physical activity, and eating); adopting healthy behaviors, such as smoke-free lifestyle or eating healthy, can reduce the risk of chronic diseases and early death among older adults. METHOD: This multidisciplinary study focuses on the feasibility of using personalized eHealthSmart&laquo;, an information technology (IT) program, by older adults with the aim of promoting healthy behaviors and reducing health disparities. Phase One, development of personalized e-technology education based on data from focus groups and survey analysis, targets ethnically and racially diverse urban elders living in the Midwest. The central thesis is that e-health promotion education is more effective when tailored to individuals. This community partnership, based on Green-Kreuter's PRECEDE-PROCEDE MODEL, targets senior centers where e-health education may be delivered. RESULTS: Thirty-five older adults participated in four focus group sessions; mean age was 69 years (SD=8.3), two-thirds were Black, single/divorced or widowed (62.5%), and most were educated (81% had high school degrees or some college). Eighty-four percent owned a computer; 63% used computers daily; 60% were &quot;Comfortable&quot; using computers; and 63% browsed the Internet routinely. Seventy-eight percent reported an interest in using e-technology to learn about health information; 87% for smoking cessation and 62% to lose weight. Focus group transcriptions were analyzed for e-program content themes for older adults (tobacco cessation and overweight/obesity) using NUD*IST and expert review. DISCUSSION: It is clear from Phase One findings that urban older adults have access, are comfortable, and willing to participate in educational programs that use e-health technology. The feasibility and efficacy of using IT to promote healthier lifestyles by older adults may result in reduced morbidity and mortality associated with unhealthy behaviors. Findings from Phase One will be used to test eHealthSmart&laquo;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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