2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159003
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Causal Model of Physical and Psychological Recovery in Cardiac Patients
Abstract:
A Causal Model of Physical and Psychological Recovery in Cardiac Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Yates, Bernice, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
More than 25% of cardiac patients have poor psychosocial outcomes following their cardiac event. The purpose of this study was to test a theoretic model of the effects of stress and social support on recovery outcomes in cardiac patients (N=213). The theoretic framework was a blending of Lazarus' stress model and Revenson's social support model. The model consisted of 6 variables: 1) illness-related stress, 2) positive support from the spouse, 3) negative support from spouse, 4) perceived activity level, 5) perceived physical recovery, and 6) psychological recovery (depression measured by the CES-D). Positive support was measured as informational, tangible, and emotional support that was perceived as helpful; problematic support was measured as the same types of support but was perceived as unhelpful or harmful. Remaining concepts were measured with investigator developed tools: illness-related stress (10 items; e.g., stress of dietary changes), perceived activity levels (4 items; able to perform tasks), and physical recovery (3 items; physical health). Patients completed questionnaires 2 months after hospital discharge. Data were analyzed using path analysis (standardized beta-coefficients are presented in parentheses). Stress had direct effects on perceived activity levels (-.40), physical recovery (-.23), and depression (.51). Positive support from the spouse had a direct effect on depression (-.14). Negative support from the spouse had a direct effect on perceived activity levels (-.18). Greater perceived activity levels had a direct effect on physical recovery (.49) which, in turn, had a direct effect on depression (-.20). These variables explained 51% of the variance in depression. These findings suggest that different aspects of social support from the spouse have differential effects on recovery outcomes in cardiac patients, positive support having a direct positive impact on depression and negative support having an indirect effect on physical recovery by reducing perceived activity levels. Stress had a direct negative impact on both recovery outcomes. Knowledge of the causal linkages between these concepts can provide direction for the development of nursing interventions aimed at improving recovery outcomes for cardiac patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Causal Model of Physical and Psychological Recovery in Cardiac Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159003-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Causal Model of Physical and Psychological Recovery in Cardiac Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yates, Bernice, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bcyates@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">More than 25% of cardiac patients have poor psychosocial outcomes following their cardiac event. The purpose of this study was to test a theoretic model of the effects of stress and social support on recovery outcomes in cardiac patients (N=213). The theoretic framework was a blending of Lazarus' stress model and Revenson's social support model. The model consisted of 6 variables: 1) illness-related stress, 2) positive support from the spouse, 3) negative support from spouse, 4) perceived activity level, 5) perceived physical recovery, and 6) psychological recovery (depression measured by the CES-D). Positive support was measured as informational, tangible, and emotional support that was perceived as helpful; problematic support was measured as the same types of support but was perceived as unhelpful or harmful. Remaining concepts were measured with investigator developed tools: illness-related stress (10 items; e.g., stress of dietary changes), perceived activity levels (4 items; able to perform tasks), and physical recovery (3 items; physical health). Patients completed questionnaires 2 months after hospital discharge. Data were analyzed using path analysis (standardized beta-coefficients are presented in parentheses). Stress had direct effects on perceived activity levels (-.40), physical recovery (-.23), and depression (.51). Positive support from the spouse had a direct effect on depression (-.14). Negative support from the spouse had a direct effect on perceived activity levels (-.18). Greater perceived activity levels had a direct effect on physical recovery (.49) which, in turn, had a direct effect on depression (-.20). These variables explained 51% of the variance in depression. These findings suggest that different aspects of social support from the spouse have differential effects on recovery outcomes in cardiac patients, positive support having a direct positive impact on depression and negative support having an indirect effect on physical recovery by reducing perceived activity levels. Stress had a direct negative impact on both recovery outcomes. Knowledge of the causal linkages between these concepts can provide direction for the development of nursing interventions aimed at improving recovery outcomes for cardiac patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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