2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159004
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Women with Chronic Conditions: Measurement Issues
Abstract:
Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Women with Chronic Conditions: Measurement Issues
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:A. K. Bekhet and L. Kidd, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Depression is the most common mental disorder and leading cause of disability among American elderly women. Its prevalence is about 25% in elders with chronic illnesses that include arthritis, hypertension, and cardiac problems. As the complementarity model of mind-body interactions suggests, measurement of depressive symptoms is complicated by the overlapping symptoms that occur with comorbid physical conditions. The 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD-20) Scale is commonly used to measure depressive symptoms, but its length may be burdensome for frail elders. Eight short forms of the CESD containing 4 to 16 items have been developed but have not been tested in elderly women with physical conditions. This study of 250 elderly women compared reliability and validity estimates for the CESD-20 with 8 shorter versions and investigated whether elderly women with arthritis (n=167), hypertension (n=119), or cardiac problems (n=90) would be similarly classified as depressed or nondepressed based on published cut scores for the shorter measures. Reliability analyses revealed an alpha=.84 for the CESD-20; alpha's for shorter scales ranged from .62 (5 items) to .83 (16 items). The average inter-item correlation was .21 for the CESD-20 and ranged from .22 (11 items) to .33 (4 items) for other versions. Correlations between the CESD-20 and the shorter versions ranged from .77 (4 items) to .96 (16 items). Using the cut score for the CESD-20, 14% of women with arthritis and 17% with hypertension or cardiac problems would have clinically significant depression. One 8-item scale and the 5-item scale identified greater depression in all 3 groups: 22% and 18% for women with arthritis; 22% and 17% for hypertension; and 19% and 17% for cardiac problems. A second 8-item scale, containing different items, identified fewer women with arthritis (10%), hypertension (10%), and cardiac problems (11%) as clinically depressed. The findings indicate a need for closer examination of item content on measures of depressive symptoms to determine whether the symptoms are a part of a co-occurring physical illness or truly reflect clinically significant depression. Further testing of shorter measures of the CESD in elderly women with comorbid physical conditions is recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive Symptoms in Elderly Women with Chronic Conditions: Measurement Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159004-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Women with Chronic Conditions: Measurement Issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. K. Bekhet and L. Kidd, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is the most common mental disorder and leading cause of disability among American elderly women. Its prevalence is about 25% in elders with chronic illnesses that include arthritis, hypertension, and cardiac problems. As the complementarity model of mind-body interactions suggests, measurement of depressive symptoms is complicated by the overlapping symptoms that occur with comorbid physical conditions. The 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD-20) Scale is commonly used to measure depressive symptoms, but its length may be burdensome for frail elders. Eight short forms of the CESD containing 4 to 16 items have been developed but have not been tested in elderly women with physical conditions. This study of 250 elderly women compared reliability and validity estimates for the CESD-20 with 8 shorter versions and investigated whether elderly women with arthritis (n=167), hypertension (n=119), or cardiac problems (n=90) would be similarly classified as depressed or nondepressed based on published cut scores for the shorter measures. Reliability analyses revealed an alpha=.84 for the CESD-20; alpha's for shorter scales ranged from .62 (5 items) to .83 (16 items). The average inter-item correlation was .21 for the CESD-20 and ranged from .22 (11 items) to .33 (4 items) for other versions. Correlations between the CESD-20 and the shorter versions ranged from .77 (4 items) to .96 (16 items). Using the cut score for the CESD-20, 14% of women with arthritis and 17% with hypertension or cardiac problems would have clinically significant depression. One 8-item scale and the 5-item scale identified greater depression in all 3 groups: 22% and 18% for women with arthritis; 22% and 17% for hypertension; and 19% and 17% for cardiac problems. A second 8-item scale, containing different items, identified fewer women with arthritis (10%), hypertension (10%), and cardiac problems (11%) as clinically depressed. The findings indicate a need for closer examination of item content on measures of depressive symptoms to determine whether the symptoms are a part of a co-occurring physical illness or truly reflect clinically significant depression. Further testing of shorter measures of the CESD in elderly women with comorbid physical conditions is recommended.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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