Stress, Resourcefulness, and Health of Women Family Members of Seriously Mentally Ill Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159005
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Resourcefulness, and Health of Women Family Members of Seriously Mentally Ill Adults
Abstract:
Stress, Resourcefulness, and Health of Women Family Members of Seriously Mentally Ill Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:J. Suresky and A.K. Bekhet, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Each year, 54 million American adults are affected by serious mental illness (SMI) and two thirds of them rely on family members for assistance. Without resourcefulness, family members may experience considerable stress, stigma by association, depressive thoughts, and poorer quality of life. Within the context of Zauszniewski's theory of resourcefulness and quality of life, this descriptive study compared 30 African American and 30 Caucasian women family members of SMI adults on perceived stress, stigma, depressive cognitions, resourcefulness, and quality of life and examined associations among these variables and the woman's age and education, the SMI adult's age and diagnosis, and their family relationship, level of assistance, and living arrangements. Significant findings were: Caucasian women reported greater stress (t=2.71) but did not differ from African American women on stigma, depressive cognitions, resourcefulness, or quality of life. Greater stress correlated with lower personal resourcefulness (r=-.38) and poorer mental health (r=-.52). Greater stigma correlated with poorer mental health (r=-.36). Fewer depressive cognitions correlated with greater personal and social resourcefulness (r's=-.60, -.35), and better physical and mental health (r's=-.39, -.69). Older age of the SMI adult correlated with lower stress (r=-.32), greater personal resourcefulness (r=;.32), and better mental health (r=.33). Longer time since diagnosis correlated with greater personal resourcefulness (r=.35). Living with and providing care for a SMI adult were associated with greater stress (t's=2.01, 2.78). Greater stress, stigma, and depressive cognitions (t's=-2.95, -2.86, -2.74) were found with bipolar disorder while greater personal and social resourcefulness (t's=4.19, 2.62) were found with schizophrenia. Mothers of SMI adults reported greater stress (f=7.33) and stigma (f=3.06), and more depressive cognitions (f=-3.56) than other female relatives. The results suggest that teaching resourcefulness skills may be beneficial across racial groups and provide direction for targeting interventions toward family members who are parents, those who have young SMI relatives, and those whose SMI relatives are in the early stages of diagnosis, especially those with bipolar disorder.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Resourcefulness, and Health of Women Family Members of Seriously Mentally Ill Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159005-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress, Resourcefulness, and Health of Women Family Members of Seriously Mentally Ill Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Suresky and A.K. Bekhet, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Each year, 54 million American adults are affected by serious mental illness (SMI) and two thirds of them rely on family members for assistance. Without resourcefulness, family members may experience considerable stress, stigma by association, depressive thoughts, and poorer quality of life. Within the context of Zauszniewski's theory of resourcefulness and quality of life, this descriptive study compared 30 African American and 30 Caucasian women family members of SMI adults on perceived stress, stigma, depressive cognitions, resourcefulness, and quality of life and examined associations among these variables and the woman's age and education, the SMI adult's age and diagnosis, and their family relationship, level of assistance, and living arrangements. Significant findings were: Caucasian women reported greater stress (t=2.71) but did not differ from African American women on stigma, depressive cognitions, resourcefulness, or quality of life. Greater stress correlated with lower personal resourcefulness (r=-.38) and poorer mental health (r=-.52). Greater stigma correlated with poorer mental health (r=-.36). Fewer depressive cognitions correlated with greater personal and social resourcefulness (r's=-.60, -.35), and better physical and mental health (r's=-.39, -.69). Older age of the SMI adult correlated with lower stress (r=-.32), greater personal resourcefulness (r=;.32), and better mental health (r=.33). Longer time since diagnosis correlated with greater personal resourcefulness (r=.35). Living with and providing care for a SMI adult were associated with greater stress (t's=2.01, 2.78). Greater stress, stigma, and depressive cognitions (t's=-2.95, -2.86, -2.74) were found with bipolar disorder while greater personal and social resourcefulness (t's=4.19, 2.62) were found with schizophrenia. Mothers of SMI adults reported greater stress (f=7.33) and stigma (f=3.06), and more depressive cognitions (f=-3.56) than other female relatives. The results suggest that teaching resourcefulness skills may be beneficial across racial groups and provide direction for targeting interventions toward family members who are parents, those who have young SMI relatives, and those whose SMI relatives are in the early stages of diagnosis, especially those with bipolar disorder.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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