2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159006
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Handheld Computer-assisted Survey Data Collection with School-age Children
Abstract:
Handheld Computer-assisted Survey Data Collection with School-age Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Anderson, Lori, MS, RN, CPNP - Co Presenter and Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6/117 CSC, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5265
Co-Authors:Erin Marriott, BS, RN, Graduate Research Assistant and Co-Presenter; Susan K. Riesch, DNSc, and Kristin E. Glaser, MS
Youth participation in health risk behaviors has immediate and long-term consequences, contributing to diminished health, educational, and social outcomes. Health risk behaviors exhibited during adolescence and adulthood originate earlier in childhood. Preventive interventions are less successful after risk behaviors are initiated. Effective interventions for this age group need to be based on data that is reliable, valid, and collected in a user-friendly manner. It has been established that computerized data collection for research, compared with paper and pencil methods, improves privacy, confidentiality, and portability, which enhances the reliability of data on sensitive topics. The purpose of this poster is to demonstrate an innovative handheld computer-assisted survey method used to collect sensitive data with children aged nine to eleven years old. Based upon concepts of privacy and developmentally appropriate methods to survey children, we developed programming tools for a handheld personal data assistant (PDA) to offer a comprehensive set of user interface design elements, relational databases, and ample programming languages so that youth could answer a large number of items, some of them sensitive. The method was developed as part of a large multi-site, national study to prevent substance use. Youth were screened for involvement in tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, early sexual behavior, dietary practices, physical inactivity, and activities that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries. If youth admitted involvement, they were probed to describe their involvement further. Those who did not admit involvement were not exposed to further items. We intend to demonstrate this reliable, valid, and parent/child-friendly method of data collection so that others may consider it for adaptation.

The work was completed at the University of Wisconsin û Madison and Indiana University, with consultation from James A. Bobula, Datean Inc. and supported by a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHandheld Computer-assisted Survey Data Collection with School-age Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159006-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Handheld Computer-assisted Survey Data Collection with School-age Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Lori, MS, RN, CPNP - Co Presenter and Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6/117 CSC, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5265</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsanderson@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Erin Marriott, BS, RN, Graduate Research Assistant and Co-Presenter; Susan K. Riesch, DNSc, and Kristin E. Glaser, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Youth participation in health risk behaviors has immediate and long-term consequences, contributing to diminished health, educational, and social outcomes. Health risk behaviors exhibited during adolescence and adulthood originate earlier in childhood. Preventive interventions are less successful after risk behaviors are initiated. Effective interventions for this age group need to be based on data that is reliable, valid, and collected in a user-friendly manner. It has been established that computerized data collection for research, compared with paper and pencil methods, improves privacy, confidentiality, and portability, which enhances the reliability of data on sensitive topics. The purpose of this poster is to demonstrate an innovative handheld computer-assisted survey method used to collect sensitive data with children aged nine to eleven years old. Based upon concepts of privacy and developmentally appropriate methods to survey children, we developed programming tools for a handheld personal data assistant (PDA) to offer a comprehensive set of user interface design elements, relational databases, and ample programming languages so that youth could answer a large number of items, some of them sensitive. The method was developed as part of a large multi-site, national study to prevent substance use. Youth were screened for involvement in tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, early sexual behavior, dietary practices, physical inactivity, and activities that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries. If youth admitted involvement, they were probed to describe their involvement further. Those who did not admit involvement were not exposed to further items. We intend to demonstrate this reliable, valid, and parent/child-friendly method of data collection so that others may consider it for adaptation.<br/><br/>The work was completed at the University of Wisconsin &ucirc; Madison and Indiana University, with consultation from James A. Bobula, Datean Inc. and supported by a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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