2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159007
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Black, Hispanic, and White Women's Perception of Heart Disease
Abstract:
Black, Hispanic, and White Women's Perception of Heart Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia, PhD, APRN, BC, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0182
Purpose: Understanding why women delay seeking treatment for symptoms suggestive of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains an elusive enigma. The purpose of this study was to examine the values, beliefs, and cognitive processes of Black, Hispanic, and White women relative to the manifestation and presentation of a MI and whether they differed based on race or ethnicity. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A descriptive, qualitative design was used to provide insight into women's perception of heart disease and heart disease risk. Subjects: A total of 30 women: 10 Hispanic, 10 Black, and 10 White women. The convenience sample was derived from two geographical locations: Detroit, Michigan and San Antonio, Texas. Method: A semi-structured interview approach was used to elicit what women think about when they hear the words heart disease and heart attack and to describe any self-management strategies currently engaged in to reduce their risk for MI. Lastly, women were asked to discuss the behaviors they would engage in should they experience symptoms of a MI. Results/Conclusions: Content analysis indicated that regardless of racial or ethnic identity, women associated heart disease and heart attacks with men who were obese, stressed, and smokers. Black and White women described actively participating in regular exercise to reduce their cardiac risk, while Hispanic women described trying to exercise and eat healthy. For symptoms suggestive of a heart attack, Black and White women generally indicated they would first seek advice from family members, while Hispanic women indicated they would call their physician. Findings from this investigation can be used to increase our understanding of how women think about heart disease and to improve women's cardiac health promotive behaviors and treatment seeking decisions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlack, Hispanic, and White Women's Perception of Heart Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159007-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Black, Hispanic, and White Women's Perception of Heart Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia, PhD, APRN, BC, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0182</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmae@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Understanding why women delay seeking treatment for symptoms suggestive of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains an elusive enigma. The purpose of this study was to examine the values, beliefs, and cognitive processes of Black, Hispanic, and White women relative to the manifestation and presentation of a MI and whether they differed based on race or ethnicity. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A descriptive, qualitative design was used to provide insight into women's perception of heart disease and heart disease risk. Subjects: A total of 30 women: 10 Hispanic, 10 Black, and 10 White women. The convenience sample was derived from two geographical locations: Detroit, Michigan and San Antonio, Texas. Method: A semi-structured interview approach was used to elicit what women think about when they hear the words heart disease and heart attack and to describe any self-management strategies currently engaged in to reduce their risk for MI. Lastly, women were asked to discuss the behaviors they would engage in should they experience symptoms of a MI. Results/Conclusions: Content analysis indicated that regardless of racial or ethnic identity, women associated heart disease and heart attacks with men who were obese, stressed, and smokers. Black and White women described actively participating in regular exercise to reduce their cardiac risk, while Hispanic women described trying to exercise and eat healthy. For symptoms suggestive of a heart attack, Black and White women generally indicated they would first seek advice from family members, while Hispanic women indicated they would call their physician. Findings from this investigation can be used to increase our understanding of how women think about heart disease and to improve women's cardiac health promotive behaviors and treatment seeking decisions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:36:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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