2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159014
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Seeking What is Best for Elders in Adult Day Care
Abstract:
Seeking What is Best for Elders in Adult Day Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bull, Margaret, PhD, MS, BS, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:414-288-3817
Family caregivers' perspectives on adult day care have received limited attention. Yet adult day care is a rapidly growing option in community-based care in the United States. During the past 25 years the number of Adult Day Care Programs in the United States increased from 300 centers in 1978; to 2100 centers in the 1980's; and more than 4000 centers by 2002. While day care is viewed as respite, difficulties adjusting to the day center can lead family caregivers to stop using the services and result in costly institutionalization of elders. The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine family caregivers' experiences in having elders at an adult day center and 2) develop a substantive theory that might guide future interventions for family caregivers.

A grounded theory approach was used for this study, as it is the method of choice for examining dynamic processes. Sixteen family caregivers, the majority of whom were female and African-American, agreed to participate. Most of the elders (93%) were African-American and had cognitive impairment. Interactive, open-ended interviews were conducted with family caregivers one month and approximately three months following the elder's admission to the day center. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. The core variable consistently evident in the data was æseeking what was best for elders.' Seeking what was best for elders was evident in family caregivers selecting a day center, advocating with day center staff, and trying to find resources to meet the elders' changing needs. However, family members frequently indicated they had difficulty anticipating changes in the elders' needs, dealing with elders' behavior, and locating resources. These findings provide insights for designing interventions to help family caregivers plan for their elders' care needs and reduce caregiver stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSeeking What is Best for Elders in Adult Day Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159014-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Seeking What is Best for Elders in Adult Day Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bull, Margaret, PhD, MS, BS, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-288-3817</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjbull001@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family caregivers' perspectives on adult day care have received limited attention. Yet adult day care is a rapidly growing option in community-based care in the United States. During the past 25 years the number of Adult Day Care Programs in the United States increased from 300 centers in 1978; to 2100 centers in the 1980's; and more than 4000 centers by 2002. While day care is viewed as respite, difficulties adjusting to the day center can lead family caregivers to stop using the services and result in costly institutionalization of elders. The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine family caregivers' experiences in having elders at an adult day center and 2) develop a substantive theory that might guide future interventions for family caregivers.<br/><br/>A grounded theory approach was used for this study, as it is the method of choice for examining dynamic processes. Sixteen family caregivers, the majority of whom were female and African-American, agreed to participate. Most of the elders (93%) were African-American and had cognitive impairment. Interactive, open-ended interviews were conducted with family caregivers one month and approximately three months following the elder's admission to the day center. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. The core variable consistently evident in the data was &aelig;seeking what was best for elders.' Seeking what was best for elders was evident in family caregivers selecting a day center, advocating with day center staff, and trying to find resources to meet the elders' changing needs. However, family members frequently indicated they had difficulty anticipating changes in the elders' needs, dealing with elders' behavior, and locating resources. These findings provide insights for designing interventions to help family caregivers plan for their elders' care needs and reduce caregiver stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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