2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conception Practices of HIV-Infected Women
Abstract:
Conception Practices of HIV-Infected Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cibulka, Nancy, PhDc, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Maryville University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 13550 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO, 63141, USA
Contact Telephone:314-529-9448
Although many studies have shown that HIV-infected women have a strong desire for a child and that the risk of perinatal transmission is very low with appropriate care, little is known about women's choices and practices related to becoming pregnant. In my nurse practitioner practice, self-disclosure was limited to 'the condom broke.' This paper draws on data from a qualitative study using interpretive phenomenology that focused on understanding the experience of HIV-infected women and their intentions to become mothers. One salient theme that emerged from this study pertains to women's conception practices. A purposive sample of 3 Caucasian and 12 African American HIV-infected women who were not pregnant and were interested in becoming mothers was recruited from an inner city clinic and a private practice. Women were interviewed in depth three times at monthly intervals. The interviews were semi-structured using interview guides previously developed and tested. During the interviews, women answered questions about the meaning of mothering, living with HIV, stress and coping, concerns, and mothering intentions. The narrative data was analyzed using interpretive strategies that included identification and analysis of exemplars and themes. All participants expressed concern about partner protection while conceiving a child. Two participants were partnered with HIV-infected men while the other 13 were in discordant relationships. Three patterns relevant to conception practices emerged from the data. The patterns were: use of fertility awareness followed by home or artificial insemination, achieving undetectable viral load before proceeding with unprotected intercourse, and using condoms without having a specific plan in mind for conception. This paper will describe how choice of conception practice is influenced by women's social realities and self-understandings. Nurses can help to shape conception decisions through caring practices and expert consultation that consider both the lived experience of HIV-infected women and the importance of partner protection. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConception Practices of HIV-Infected Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Conception Practices of HIV-Infected Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cibulka, Nancy, PhDc, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maryville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 13550 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO, 63141, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-529-9448</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ncibulka@maryville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although many studies have shown that HIV-infected women have a strong desire for a child and that the risk of perinatal transmission is very low with appropriate care, little is known about women's choices and practices related to becoming pregnant. In my nurse practitioner practice, self-disclosure was limited to 'the condom broke.' This paper draws on data from a qualitative study using interpretive phenomenology that focused on understanding the experience of HIV-infected women and their intentions to become mothers. One salient theme that emerged from this study pertains to women's conception practices. A purposive sample of 3 Caucasian and 12 African American HIV-infected women who were not pregnant and were interested in becoming mothers was recruited from an inner city clinic and a private practice. Women were interviewed in depth three times at monthly intervals. The interviews were semi-structured using interview guides previously developed and tested. During the interviews, women answered questions about the meaning of mothering, living with HIV, stress and coping, concerns, and mothering intentions. The narrative data was analyzed using interpretive strategies that included identification and analysis of exemplars and themes. All participants expressed concern about partner protection while conceiving a child. Two participants were partnered with HIV-infected men while the other 13 were in discordant relationships. Three patterns relevant to conception practices emerged from the data. The patterns were: use of fertility awareness followed by home or artificial insemination, achieving undetectable viral load before proceeding with unprotected intercourse, and using condoms without having a specific plan in mind for conception. This paper will describe how choice of conception practice is influenced by women's social realities and self-understandings. Nurses can help to shape conception decisions through caring practices and expert consultation that consider both the lived experience of HIV-infected women and the importance of partner protection. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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