Parental Alcohol Problems, Antisociality, and Impoverished Self-Concept: Vulnerability for Alcohol Use and Misuse?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159018
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Alcohol Problems, Antisociality, and Impoverished Self-Concept: Vulnerability for Alcohol Use and Misuse?
Abstract:
Parental Alcohol Problems, Antisociality, and Impoverished Self-Concept: Vulnerability for Alcohol Use and Misuse?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Corte, Colleen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7025
Based on earlier studies that showed a relationship between self-concept disturbances and alcohol use in young adults with alcohol dependence (Corte & Stein, 2003) and alcohol misuse in high-risk adolescents (Corte, Fitzgerald & Zucker, 2004; Corte & Stein, 2005), we examined relationships between structural properties of the self-concept and two known risk factors for alcohol problems (high antisociality and parental alcohol problems) in an inner city community sample of preadolescents (9-12 years). We hypothesized that children with high antisociality and parental alcohol problems would have an impoverished self-concept - one comprised of few positive and many negative self-definitions. Twenty-eight predominantly minority (64% Black, 32% Hispanic, 4% White) children (mean age=10.4+1.2 years) were given the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test-6 (Hodgins et al.1993), the Antisocial Behavior Checklist for Youth (Zucker & Fitzgerald, 1996), and the Alcohol Use & Misuse scale (Shope et al., 1993). Positive and negative self-definitions were measured using the number of positive or negative items endorsed as "really true for me" from the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985). Thirty-nine percent of the sample had parental alcohol problems, and as predicted, they endorsed fewer positive self-definitions (10.5 vs 16.1) and more negative self-definitions (9.2 vs 4.0) than children without parental alcohol problems, ts>2.3, ps<.03. Interestingly, antisociality was correlated in the opposite of predicted directions with positive (r=.32) and negative (r=-.22) self-definitions. Eleven percent (n=3) of the children reported prior alcohol use. Prior alcohol use was not correlated with parental alcohol problems (r=-.15), but was strongly positively correlated with antisociality (r=.67). These findings raise interesting questions about how antisociality and parental alcohol problems may influence the development of an impoverished self-concept and contribute to early alcohol use and misuse. Longitudinal work is planned to address these important questions and guide the development of interventions. Funded by UIC College of Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Alcohol Problems, Antisociality, and Impoverished Self-Concept: Vulnerability for Alcohol Use and Misuse?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159018-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Alcohol Problems, Antisociality, and Impoverished Self-Concept: Vulnerability for Alcohol Use and Misuse?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corte, Colleen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7025</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccorte@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Based on earlier studies that showed a relationship between self-concept disturbances and alcohol use in young adults with alcohol dependence (Corte &amp; Stein, 2003) and alcohol misuse in high-risk adolescents (Corte, Fitzgerald &amp; Zucker, 2004; Corte &amp; Stein, 2005), we examined relationships between structural properties of the self-concept and two known risk factors for alcohol problems (high antisociality and parental alcohol problems) in an inner city community sample of preadolescents (9-12 years). We hypothesized that children with high antisociality and parental alcohol problems would have an impoverished self-concept - one comprised of few positive and many negative self-definitions. Twenty-eight predominantly minority (64% Black, 32% Hispanic, 4% White) children (mean age=10.4+1.2 years) were given the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test-6 (Hodgins et al.1993), the Antisocial Behavior Checklist for Youth (Zucker &amp; Fitzgerald, 1996), and the Alcohol Use &amp; Misuse scale (Shope et al., 1993). Positive and negative self-definitions were measured using the number of positive or negative items endorsed as &quot;really true for me&quot; from the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985). Thirty-nine percent of the sample had parental alcohol problems, and as predicted, they endorsed fewer positive self-definitions (10.5 vs 16.1) and more negative self-definitions (9.2 vs 4.0) than children without parental alcohol problems, ts&gt;2.3, ps&lt;.03. Interestingly, antisociality was correlated in the opposite of predicted directions with positive (r=.32) and negative (r=-.22) self-definitions. Eleven percent (n=3) of the children reported prior alcohol use. Prior alcohol use was not correlated with parental alcohol problems (r=-.15), but was strongly positively correlated with antisociality (r=.67). These findings raise interesting questions about how antisociality and parental alcohol problems may influence the development of an impoverished self-concept and contribute to early alcohol use and misuse. Longitudinal work is planned to address these important questions and guide the development of interventions. Funded by UIC College of Nursing</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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