2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159019
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults After Cardiac Events: Who is at Risk for Long-Term Disability?
Abstract:
Older Adults After Cardiac Events: Who is at Risk for Long-Term Disability?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dolansky, Mary, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 7560 Deer Path, Brecksville, OH, 44141, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-0568
Co-Authors:Shirley M. Moore, PhD, FAAN, RN, Professor
Older adults following cardiac events are vulnerable to experiencing progressive disability. Using the Disablement Model, the purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the physical and psychological predictors (measured at discharge) of 6-month disability in older adults following cardiac events (CABG, Valve and PTCA). In a sample of adults (N=60; age M=78, range 70-89) recovering from a cardiac event, data on physical function (objective functional limitations, perception of pre-hospital functional limitations and pre-hospital exercise habits) and depression were collected prior to discharge. Disability (difficulty performing ADL's and IADL's) was collected at 6 months. Results of regression analysis indicated that when controlling for gender and comorbidity, functional limitations, exercise (F=3.2, p=.02), and depression (F=4.8, p=.01) were significant predictors of disability 6 months later. The model explained 22% of the variance in disability. Interestingly, 22% were discharged to a skilled nursing facility and 60% received home care. The readmission rate during the first 3 weeks was 34%. Six months after discharge 20-27% of the older adults modified their activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, and walking in the house) and 39%-56% modified their instrumental activities of daily living (light and heavy housework, shopping and cooking). These findings suggest that discharge status assessment can assist nurses in the identification of older adults at risk for future disability. Also, it appears that recovery of these older adults involves transitional care services that may require a cardiac rehabilitation component that specifically addresses interventions to reduce disability. (Supported by the JAHF Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Scholarship Program)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults After Cardiac Events: Who is at Risk for Long-Term Disability?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159019-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults After Cardiac Events: Who is at Risk for Long-Term Disability?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dolansky, Mary, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 7560 Deer Path, Brecksville, OH, 44141, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-0568</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.dolansky@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shirley M. Moore, PhD, FAAN, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Older adults following cardiac events are vulnerable to experiencing progressive disability. Using the Disablement Model, the purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the physical and psychological predictors (measured at discharge) of 6-month disability in older adults following cardiac events (CABG, Valve and PTCA). In a sample of adults (N=60; age M=78, range 70-89) recovering from a cardiac event, data on physical function (objective functional limitations, perception of pre-hospital functional limitations and pre-hospital exercise habits) and depression were collected prior to discharge. Disability (difficulty performing ADL's and IADL's) was collected at 6 months. Results of regression analysis indicated that when controlling for gender and comorbidity, functional limitations, exercise (F=3.2, p=.02), and depression (F=4.8, p=.01) were significant predictors of disability 6 months later. The model explained 22% of the variance in disability. Interestingly, 22% were discharged to a skilled nursing facility and 60% received home care. The readmission rate during the first 3 weeks was 34%. Six months after discharge 20-27% of the older adults modified their activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, and walking in the house) and 39%-56% modified their instrumental activities of daily living (light and heavy housework, shopping and cooking). These findings suggest that discharge status assessment can assist nurses in the identification of older adults at risk for future disability. Also, it appears that recovery of these older adults involves transitional care services that may require a cardiac rehabilitation component that specifically addresses interventions to reduce disability. (Supported by the JAHF Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Scholarship Program)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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