2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159021
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Online Family Caregivers' Information Needs
Abstract:
Online Family Caregivers' Information Needs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ewing, Danita Lee, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2121 University Ave #12, Madison, WI, 53706, USA
Contact Telephone:608 238 6687
Purpose: The study's purpose was to identify benefits and limitations of the Internet as a source of support for family caregiving. Conceptual Framework: Strauss and Corbin's Chronic Illness Trajectory Model and Symbolic Interactionism provided the study's conceptual and methodological underpinnings. Subjects: Caregivers (n=15) were aged 24 to 60 (mean 45.3). All but one Hispanic caregiver were white and female. Most (85.7%) had at least some college education. Methodology: Caregivers were interviewed by telephone using the Intensive Interviewing method. Interviews lasted 30 to 90 minutes, were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results: The greatest perceived benefit caregivers identified from their Internet use was timely access to relevant, comprehensible information to aid them in caring for their ill family member. Information fell into three categories. Disease Oriented information was largely factual. Caregivers sought the information to provide a baseline understanding of what was happening with their care recipient's illness, then only sought further information in light of a change in status. Treatment Oriented information focused on the treatments that care recipients were undergoing. Caregivers periodically sought additional information as the care recipients' condition changed or to evaluate for efficacy. The greatest need caregivers expressed was for Practical information on how to handle day-to-day caregiving challenges. Subsets of this category were Problem Solving/Caregiving Tips, How to/Skills, Signs and Symptoms/Changes in Condition and Services. Caregivers sought this information most frequently. Other caregivers' experiences were perceived as the best source of this information. Occasional difficulty comprehending technical language and sifting through large volumes of information were the greatest limitations. Conclusions: The Internet met several categories of information needs for caregivers. Acknowledgements: National Research Service Award T32 Families in Health, Illness, and Transition; Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Psi Chapter; Frances DeZeeuw Memorial Scholarship Award
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOnline Family Caregivers' Information Needsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159021-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Online Family Caregivers' Information Needs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ewing, Danita Lee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2121 University Ave #12, Madison, WI, 53706, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608 238 6687</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ewing2@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The study's purpose was to identify benefits and limitations of the Internet as a source of support for family caregiving. Conceptual Framework: Strauss and Corbin's Chronic Illness Trajectory Model and Symbolic Interactionism provided the study's conceptual and methodological underpinnings. Subjects: Caregivers (n=15) were aged 24 to 60 (mean 45.3). All but one Hispanic caregiver were white and female. Most (85.7%) had at least some college education. Methodology: Caregivers were interviewed by telephone using the Intensive Interviewing method. Interviews lasted 30 to 90 minutes, were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results: The greatest perceived benefit caregivers identified from their Internet use was timely access to relevant, comprehensible information to aid them in caring for their ill family member. Information fell into three categories. Disease Oriented information was largely factual. Caregivers sought the information to provide a baseline understanding of what was happening with their care recipient's illness, then only sought further information in light of a change in status. Treatment Oriented information focused on the treatments that care recipients were undergoing. Caregivers periodically sought additional information as the care recipients' condition changed or to evaluate for efficacy. The greatest need caregivers expressed was for Practical information on how to handle day-to-day caregiving challenges. Subsets of this category were Problem Solving/Caregiving Tips, How to/Skills, Signs and Symptoms/Changes in Condition and Services. Caregivers sought this information most frequently. Other caregivers' experiences were perceived as the best source of this information. Occasional difficulty comprehending technical language and sifting through large volumes of information were the greatest limitations. Conclusions: The Internet met several categories of information needs for caregivers. Acknowledgements: National Research Service Award T32 Families in Health, Illness, and Transition; Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Psi Chapter; Frances DeZeeuw Memorial Scholarship Award <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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