Do Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Influence Preschool Unintentional Injury Risk?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159025
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Influence Preschool Unintentional Injury Risk?
Abstract:
Do Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Influence Preschool Unintentional Injury Risk?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Garzon, Dawn, PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri- St. Louis
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON - One University Boulevard (MC 529), 228 Nursing Administration Building, St. Louis, MO, 63121, USA
Contact Telephone:314-516-7094
Co-Authors:Hongyan Huang, PhD, Richard D Todd, PhD, MD, Professor
Purpose: This study explores the relationships between preschool attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), injury risk-taking behavior, and unintentional injury. Background: Unintentional injury is a significant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. There are conflicting data about the relationship between child disruptive behavior disorders and unintentional injury, especially in preschool children. Methodology: Parents (n=179) of one- to four-year-old children who presented to the emergency department (ED) of an urban teaching hospital participated in this case control study. Parents of 99 injured and 80 non-injured children completed questionnaires for the assessment of symptoms of ADHD/ODD and child injury risk-taking behavior. Results: The frequency of ADHD and ODD was similar for both groups (6 controls [8%] versus 8 cases [8%] met ADHD criteria; 16 controls [20%] versus 16 cases [1%6] met ODD criteria). Children with ODD were significantly more likely to have higher numbers of injury risk behaviors than their non-affected peers (OR=7.07, 95% CI 2.12-23.18). Children with injuries were three times more likely to have high risk-taking behaviors than controls (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.3-6.7). Implications: Although ADHD/ODD diagnosis and injury risk-taking behavior were related, preschool children with ADHD or ODD were not at increased risk for unintentional injury requiring ED treatment. These findings suggest that disruptive behavior disorders, which have been previously related to injury in school age children, are not major contributors to unintentional injury in preschool children. Nurses should assess preschoolers for injury risk-taking and target children with these behaviors for focused injury prevention education. Further research should clarify the theory that a combination of parent factors and child factors may come together to result in increased injury risk, and to refine the understanding of how similar injury rates in males and females relate to specific injury risk-taking behaviors in preschool children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Influence Preschool Unintentional Injury Risk?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159025-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Influence Preschool Unintentional Injury Risk?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garzon, Dawn, PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri- St. Louis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - One University Boulevard (MC 529), 228 Nursing Administration Building, St. Louis, MO, 63121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-516-7094</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">d_garzon@umsl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hongyan Huang, PhD, Richard D Todd, PhD, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study explores the relationships between preschool attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), injury risk-taking behavior, and unintentional injury. Background: Unintentional injury is a significant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. There are conflicting data about the relationship between child disruptive behavior disorders and unintentional injury, especially in preschool children. Methodology: Parents (n=179) of one- to four-year-old children who presented to the emergency department (ED) of an urban teaching hospital participated in this case control study. Parents of 99 injured and 80 non-injured children completed questionnaires for the assessment of symptoms of ADHD/ODD and child injury risk-taking behavior. Results: The frequency of ADHD and ODD was similar for both groups (6 controls [8%] versus 8 cases [8%] met ADHD criteria; 16 controls [20%] versus 16 cases [1%6] met ODD criteria). Children with ODD were significantly more likely to have higher numbers of injury risk behaviors than their non-affected peers (OR=7.07, 95% CI 2.12-23.18). Children with injuries were three times more likely to have high risk-taking behaviors than controls (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.3-6.7). Implications: Although ADHD/ODD diagnosis and injury risk-taking behavior were related, preschool children with ADHD or ODD were not at increased risk for unintentional injury requiring ED treatment. These findings suggest that disruptive behavior disorders, which have been previously related to injury in school age children, are not major contributors to unintentional injury in preschool children. Nurses should assess preschoolers for injury risk-taking and target children with these behaviors for focused injury prevention education. Further research should clarify the theory that a combination of parent factors and child factors may come together to result in increased injury risk, and to refine the understanding of how similar injury rates in males and females relate to specific injury risk-taking behaviors in preschool children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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