Complementary Health Practices: Promoting Wellness in Clients and Health Care Practitioners

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159026
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary Health Practices: Promoting Wellness in Clients and Health Care Practitioners
Abstract:
Complementary Health Practices: Promoting Wellness in Clients and Health Care Practitioners
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Grabia, Susan, MPH, BS - Study Contact and Co-Presenter
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue - H6/242, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5276
Co-Authors:Diane R. Lauver, PhD, APRN, Professor and Co-presenter
Problem: Historically, nursing's roots are in holistic health principles. Today, more researchers are evaluating, and clients seek information about or use, complementary health practices (CHP). CHP refer to a set of low risk, non-invasive practices to enhance wellbeing, reduce risk factors for disease, or allay symptoms and that could be used with conventional medical care. Yet, nursing curricula do not consistently offer content and evidence-based reviews about CHP. Purpose: Our study purpose was to evaluate the impact of a new course, Complementary Health Practices, on a) knowledge, b) abilities to access and interpret research, and c) self-care barriers regarding CHP. Framework: Our project was based on foundational assumptions in evidence-based practice and nursing (e.g., people are body-mind-spirit beings who prefer participation in self-care and desire wellbeing). Sample: Students of nursing, pharmacology, women's studies, and other fields enrolled. In this initial offering, 13 students completed the course. Method: A pre-test, post-test design was used. In a 3-credit elective, we provided understandings of CHP for use with clients, program planning and self-care. We included assignments regarding evidence-bases for CHP, self-assessments of content and skill mastery, and experiential learning (e.g., guided meditation, yoga). In a triangulation approach, qualitative and quantitative questions assessed: a) knowledge, b) abilities to access and interpret research, and c) self-care barriers regarding CHP. Analyses: Responses to open-ended questions included: "learned to think critically", "make mandatory", "best class ever", and "felt more complete". Comparisons of pre-post scores revealed significant increases in: knowledge, abilities to access and interpret research, and appreciations for barriers to engaging in self-care. Relevance: Although our study supports offering CHP courses again, we aim to include more students. With knowledge, research skills, and experiences regarding CHP, clinicians can better meet clients' needs and engage in CHP themselves. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary Health Practices: Promoting Wellness in Clients and Health Care Practitionersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159026-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complementary Health Practices: Promoting Wellness in Clients and Health Care Practitioners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grabia, Susan, MPH, BS - Study Contact and Co-Presenter</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue - H6/242, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5276</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">grabia@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diane R. Lauver, PhD, APRN, Professor and Co-presenter</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Historically, nursing's roots are in holistic health principles. Today, more researchers are evaluating, and clients seek information about or use, complementary health practices (CHP). CHP refer to a set of low risk, non-invasive practices to enhance wellbeing, reduce risk factors for disease, or allay symptoms and that could be used with conventional medical care. Yet, nursing curricula do not consistently offer content and evidence-based reviews about CHP. Purpose: Our study purpose was to evaluate the impact of a new course, Complementary Health Practices, on a) knowledge, b) abilities to access and interpret research, and c) self-care barriers regarding CHP. Framework: Our project was based on foundational assumptions in evidence-based practice and nursing (e.g., people are body-mind-spirit beings who prefer participation in self-care and desire wellbeing). Sample: Students of nursing, pharmacology, women's studies, and other fields enrolled. In this initial offering, 13 students completed the course. Method: A pre-test, post-test design was used. In a 3-credit elective, we provided understandings of CHP for use with clients, program planning and self-care. We included assignments regarding evidence-bases for CHP, self-assessments of content and skill mastery, and experiential learning (e.g., guided meditation, yoga). In a triangulation approach, qualitative and quantitative questions assessed: a) knowledge, b) abilities to access and interpret research, and c) self-care barriers regarding CHP. Analyses: Responses to open-ended questions included: &quot;learned to think critically&quot;, &quot;make mandatory&quot;, &quot;best class ever&quot;, and &quot;felt more complete&quot;. Comparisons of pre-post scores revealed significant increases in: knowledge, abilities to access and interpret research, and appreciations for barriers to engaging in self-care. Relevance: Although our study supports offering CHP courses again, we aim to include more students. With knowledge, research skills, and experiences regarding CHP, clinicians can better meet clients' needs and engage in CHP themselves. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.