2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159027
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unanswered Questions: The Legacy of Atomic Veterans
Abstract:
Unanswered Questions: The Legacy of Atomic Veterans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hansen, Deborah, MSN, APRN, BC, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Department of Veterans Affairs
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 648 Hickory Knoll, Ballwin, MO, 63021, USA
Contact Telephone:636-256-9357
Co-Authors:Cheryl L. Schriner, PhD, MSN, BSN, BC, Dean
The Department of Veterans Affairs identified 195,000 servicemen as involved in the occupation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, with an additional 210,000 American personnel participating in 200 post-war nuclear tests (National Research Council, 2003). At the direction of Public Law 103-446 and the request of the Veteran Administration, the Medical Follow Up Agency established a committee to explore links between radiation exposure and adverse reproductive events. A report by The Institute of Medicine (IOM) addressed the reproductive concerns of Atomic Veterans, declined to recommend further study (IOM, 1995), thereby creating a catch-22 for future generations to obtain related medical benefits. In the decade since the IOM report, a growing body of knowledge recognized the role of paternal exposures in adverse reproductive outcomes.

To address concerns of Atomic Veterans and their families, a historical analysis was conducted that included examinations of (a) health effects, (b) genetic effects, (c) paternal contributions to adverse reproductive outcomes, and (d) dose reconstruction. Additionally, roles of legislation in the determination of medical benefits for Atomic Veterans was explored. Christoffel's conceptual model for public health advocacy was the framework in the study (Christoffel, 2000).

Conclusions resulting from the content analysis of data included, (a) unique risks of adult males exposed to environmental hazards, (b) necessity of legislative review of the level of support currently provided to Atomic Veterans, (c) need to reexamine the role of traditional hypothesis testing in legislative decisions, (d) importance of nursing advocacy to influence public health policy change and practice, and (e) need for additional research related to Atomic Veterans. This study demonstrated that the role of professional nurses as public health advocates, can ultimately effect change in public policy and resource allocation at the governmental level. Promoting advocacy through nursing research can lead to optimizing the public's health and well-being.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnanswered Questions: The Legacy of Atomic Veteransen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159027-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unanswered Questions: The Legacy of Atomic Veterans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansen, Deborah, MSN, APRN, BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Department of Veterans Affairs</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 648 Hickory Knoll, Ballwin, MO, 63021, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">636-256-9357</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">d.hansen@att.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl L. Schriner, PhD, MSN, BSN, BC, Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Department of Veterans Affairs identified 195,000 servicemen as involved in the occupation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, with an additional 210,000 American personnel participating in 200 post-war nuclear tests (National Research Council, 2003). At the direction of Public Law 103-446 and the request of the Veteran Administration, the Medical Follow Up Agency established a committee to explore links between radiation exposure and adverse reproductive events. A report by The Institute of Medicine (IOM) addressed the reproductive concerns of Atomic Veterans, declined to recommend further study (IOM, 1995), thereby creating a catch-22 for future generations to obtain related medical benefits. In the decade since the IOM report, a growing body of knowledge recognized the role of paternal exposures in adverse reproductive outcomes.<br/><br/>To address concerns of Atomic Veterans and their families, a historical analysis was conducted that included examinations of (a) health effects, (b) genetic effects, (c) paternal contributions to adverse reproductive outcomes, and (d) dose reconstruction. Additionally, roles of legislation in the determination of medical benefits for Atomic Veterans was explored. Christoffel's conceptual model for public health advocacy was the framework in the study (Christoffel, 2000).<br/><br/>Conclusions resulting from the content analysis of data included, (a) unique risks of adult males exposed to environmental hazards, (b) necessity of legislative review of the level of support currently provided to Atomic Veterans, (c) need to reexamine the role of traditional hypothesis testing in legislative decisions, (d) importance of nursing advocacy to influence public health policy change and practice, and (e) need for additional research related to Atomic Veterans. This study demonstrated that the role of professional nurses as public health advocates, can ultimately effect change in public policy and resource allocation at the governmental level. Promoting advocacy through nursing research can lead to optimizing the public's health and well-being.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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