Developing a Theoretical Framework to Explain African-American Pastors' Response to HIV Risk Reduction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Theoretical Framework to Explain African-American Pastors' Response to HIV Risk Reduction
Abstract:
Developing a Theoretical Framework to Explain African-American Pastors' Response to HIV Risk Reduction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Harris, Gina, MSN, MA, CRNA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:Public Health Nursing, 845 S. Damen, Suite 923, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:(312) 996-9246
African-Americans make up approximately 13% of the United States population, and are disproportionately affected by HIV, comprising 50-75 % of all HIV/AIDS infection. In 2002, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in 30,120 newly HIV infected adult men, 13,890 were African-American, with a diagnosis rate 9 times that of Caucasian males. Also in 2002, African-American adult females constituted 7,159 of a total of 10,589 newly infected adult females, representing a diagnosis rate 24 times that of Caucasian females. In children 13 years and younger, 57 African-American children were newly diagnosed with HIV, amongst a total of 84 children; a rate 7 times higher than Caucasian children. Although the African-American church has historically played a dominant spiritual, social and political role in is community, and is active in health programming, the African-American church is not visible at the forefront of this health problem. The outcome of this research was the development of a conceptual framework that helps to explain the social, political, and attitudinal factors impacting African-American pastoral participation in HIV risk reduction interventions. To achieve this outcome, a literature review was conducted to discover theories that help to explain the level of African-American pastoral involvement with HIV risk-reduction. Four theories were investigated, and concepts/variables such as: (a) marginalization, (b) stigmatization, (c) pastoral care, and (d) practical theology, were analyzed. A theoretical synthesis was presented, and those concepts that contained the ability to explain African-American church responses to HIV/AIDS were integrated into a comprehensive conceptual framework.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Theoretical Framework to Explain African-American Pastors' Response to HIV Risk Reductionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Theoretical Framework to Explain African-American Pastors' Response to HIV Risk Reduction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harris, Gina, MSN, MA, CRNA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Public Health Nursing, 845 S. Damen, Suite 923, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(312) 996-9246</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gharri6@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African-Americans make up approximately 13% of the United States population, and are disproportionately affected by HIV, comprising 50-75 % of all HIV/AIDS infection. In 2002, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in 30,120 newly HIV infected adult men, 13,890 were African-American, with a diagnosis rate 9 times that of Caucasian males. Also in 2002, African-American adult females constituted 7,159 of a total of 10,589 newly infected adult females, representing a diagnosis rate 24 times that of Caucasian females. In children 13 years and younger, 57 African-American children were newly diagnosed with HIV, amongst a total of 84 children; a rate 7 times higher than Caucasian children. Although the African-American church has historically played a dominant spiritual, social and political role in is community, and is active in health programming, the African-American church is not visible at the forefront of this health problem. The outcome of this research was the development of a conceptual framework that helps to explain the social, political, and attitudinal factors impacting African-American pastoral participation in HIV risk reduction interventions. To achieve this outcome, a literature review was conducted to discover theories that help to explain the level of African-American pastoral involvement with HIV risk-reduction. Four theories were investigated, and concepts/variables such as: (a) marginalization, (b) stigmatization, (c) pastoral care, and (d) practical theology, were analyzed. A theoretical synthesis was presented, and those concepts that contained the ability to explain African-American church responses to HIV/AIDS were integrated into a comprehensive conceptual framework.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:37:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:37:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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