2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159030
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pregnant Donor Oocyte Recipients: The Lived Experience
Abstract:
Pregnant Donor Oocyte Recipients: The Lived Experience
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hershberger, Patricia, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Center for Enhancement of Cognitive Function, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 3217, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-764-6127
Demand for assisted reproductive services using donor oocytes has escalated worldwide. Yet scientific inquiry in this area has been limited with the majority of research focusing on women who provide oocytes to infertile women. Fewer studies have sought to understand the ubiquitous complexities among women who receive donated oocytes. Using a phenomenological approach, the purpose of this study was to describe pregnant, recipient women's experience of using donor oocytes. Eight women, between the ages of 33 and 46 years (mean age = 40.6 years), participated in the study. All of the women were recruited at a large urban infertility center and were between 9 and 23 gestational weeks pregnant at the time of data collection. Each of the women participated in two open-ended, in-depth, audiotaped interviews and answered a demographic questionnaire. The investigator recorded field notes and kept a methodological and informational journal. Analysis of the data followed Colaizzi's approach for phenomenology. Five major themes emerged from the women's description of their experience, which were: desiring motherhood, accepting donor oocytes, deliberating decisions, contemplating disclosure issues, and looking to the future. The women reported their desire for motherhood and the motivation and various paths their lives took towards their eventual acceptance of donor oocyte treatment. Decisions pertaining to the selection of oocyte donor and disposition of cryopreserved embryos were complex. The women's description of disclosing the nature of the conception to family members, friends and the resulting child was consistent although the women's intent to disclose varied. Future concerns about the impact of advancing maternal age and the multifaceted issues of parenting a donor oocyte child were reported. This research provides nurses with an understanding of third party reproduction from the oocyte recipient women's perspective. Implications for nursing practice include facilitating more accurate assessments, increasing empathy, and developing evidence-based interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePregnant Donor Oocyte Recipients: The Lived Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159030-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pregnant Donor Oocyte Recipients: The Lived Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hershberger, Patricia, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Center for Enhancement of Cognitive Function, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 3217, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-764-6127</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phersh@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Demand for assisted reproductive services using donor oocytes has escalated worldwide. Yet scientific inquiry in this area has been limited with the majority of research focusing on women who provide oocytes to infertile women. Fewer studies have sought to understand the ubiquitous complexities among women who receive donated oocytes. Using a phenomenological approach, the purpose of this study was to describe pregnant, recipient women's experience of using donor oocytes. Eight women, between the ages of 33 and 46 years (mean age = 40.6 years), participated in the study. All of the women were recruited at a large urban infertility center and were between 9 and 23 gestational weeks pregnant at the time of data collection. Each of the women participated in two open-ended, in-depth, audiotaped interviews and answered a demographic questionnaire. The investigator recorded field notes and kept a methodological and informational journal. Analysis of the data followed Colaizzi's approach for phenomenology. Five major themes emerged from the women's description of their experience, which were: desiring motherhood, accepting donor oocytes, deliberating decisions, contemplating disclosure issues, and looking to the future. The women reported their desire for motherhood and the motivation and various paths their lives took towards their eventual acceptance of donor oocyte treatment. Decisions pertaining to the selection of oocyte donor and disposition of cryopreserved embryos were complex. The women's description of disclosing the nature of the conception to family members, friends and the resulting child was consistent although the women's intent to disclose varied. Future concerns about the impact of advancing maternal age and the multifaceted issues of parenting a donor oocyte child were reported. This research provides nurses with an understanding of third party reproduction from the oocyte recipient women's perspective. Implications for nursing practice include facilitating more accurate assessments, increasing empathy, and developing evidence-based interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.