2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159031
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Senior Apartment Residents' Reported Self-Care Activities
Abstract:
Senior Apartment Residents' Reported Self-Care Activities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hertz, Judith, PhD, MSN, BSN, R
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Contact Telephone:815/753-0662
Co-Authors:Jeanette Rossetti, EdD, MSN, BSN, RN, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study, part of a larger triangulated study, was to describe self-care activities reported by older adults living independently in apartments. Problem: Most of the growing older adult population lives independently and is relatively healthy despite the presence of chronic illnesses and functional declines. The activities older adults employ to manage their health processes are poorly understood. Improved understanding would facilitate nurses' abilities to design health promotion interventions for this population. Framework: The mid-range self-care theory from Modeling and Role-Modeling nursing theory (Erickson, Tomlin & Swain, 1988) framed the study. In this theory, self-care activities are unique and incorporate mobilizing self-care knowledge and resources to influence one's health. Participants: Persons 65 and older who lived in a seniors' apartment building volunteered to participate in a follow-up interview after completion of written surveys. To obtain diverse perspectives, interview respondents were purposefully selected based on age, self-rated health and gender. Sampling continued until data saturation. The final sample was comprised of 10 women and 4 men ranging in age from 67 to 91 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview guide elicited respondents' perceptions of their self-care activities. The 45-minute, tape-recorded interview was conducted in a private area of each respondent's apartment building and then transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using traditional thematic analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994). Results: Sixteen categories of self-care activities emerged from the data. These categories clustered around five emergent themes: (a) adapting to life as an older adult; (b) meeting needs for affiliated-individuation; (c) using self-care knowledge to promote and strive for holistic health; (d) self-managing health problems and issues; and (e) preventing health problems and issues. Implications: Findings represent older adults' self-care activities. Implications will be delineated for health promotion via nursing practice, theory development and future research regarding older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSenior Apartment Residents' Reported Self-Care Activitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159031-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Senior Apartment Residents' Reported Self-Care Activities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertz, Judith, PhD, MSN, BSN, R</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">815/753-0662</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhertz@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeanette Rossetti, EdD, MSN, BSN, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study, part of a larger triangulated study, was to describe self-care activities reported by older adults living independently in apartments. Problem: Most of the growing older adult population lives independently and is relatively healthy despite the presence of chronic illnesses and functional declines. The activities older adults employ to manage their health processes are poorly understood. Improved understanding would facilitate nurses' abilities to design health promotion interventions for this population. Framework: The mid-range self-care theory from Modeling and Role-Modeling nursing theory (Erickson, Tomlin &amp; Swain, 1988) framed the study. In this theory, self-care activities are unique and incorporate mobilizing self-care knowledge and resources to influence one's health. Participants: Persons 65 and older who lived in a seniors' apartment building volunteered to participate in a follow-up interview after completion of written surveys. To obtain diverse perspectives, interview respondents were purposefully selected based on age, self-rated health and gender. Sampling continued until data saturation. The final sample was comprised of 10 women and 4 men ranging in age from 67 to 91 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview guide elicited respondents' perceptions of their self-care activities. The 45-minute, tape-recorded interview was conducted in a private area of each respondent's apartment building and then transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using traditional thematic analysis (Miles &amp; Huberman, 1994). Results: Sixteen categories of self-care activities emerged from the data. These categories clustered around five emergent themes: (a) adapting to life as an older adult; (b) meeting needs for affiliated-individuation; (c) using self-care knowledge to promote and strive for holistic health; (d) self-managing health problems and issues; and (e) preventing health problems and issues. Implications: Findings represent older adults' self-care activities. Implications will be delineated for health promotion via nursing practice, theory development and future research regarding older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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