2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perspectives of HIV Infected Women Who Have Significant Adherence Difficulties
Abstract:
Perspectives of HIV Infected Women Who Have Significant Adherence Difficulties
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5464
Co-Authors:Patricia E. Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Medication adherence is vital to the success of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART), which has been shown to suppress viral replication, and slow disease progression. At least 95% adherence to the medication regimen is necessary to get the full benefit from HAART, yet about half of the people on HAART do not take the medications as prescribed. The purpose of this presentation is to explore personal and contextual factors that influence HIV-infected women's capacity to initiate and adhere to treatment regimens. A Feminist Narrative conceptual framework was used. The setting for this NIH funded qualitative study (#R01NR04840) was both urban and rural areas across the state of Wisconsin. Women were recruited using targeted chain referral sampling. The sample for this presentation was 14 women who had difficulty with HIV medication adherence, who participated in a larger longitudinal qualitative study of 55 racially and culturally diverse women with HIV. The design of the study was a repeated narrative interview design in which up to ten, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each woman over a two-year period. The instruments were baseline and prospective interview guides used to encourage women to tell their stories and describe their experiences as women who were HIV positive. Interviews of approximately 2 hours in length were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered into N-VIVO, a software program, to facilitate management and coding of these data. The coded interviews were analyzed using multistage narrative analysis. The findings suggest issues of non-adherence include perceptions that the side effects of the medication are indicators of serious harm being caused to the self, limited health literacy, weak relationships with providers, and inexperience with daily routines. The findings are relevant for assisting nurses to understand and effectively support women in managing the often difficult and uncomfortable HIV medication regimens.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerspectives of HIV Infected Women Who Have Significant Adherence Difficultiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perspectives of HIV Infected Women Who Have Significant Adherence Difficulties</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5464</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hbrandt@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia E. Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Medication adherence is vital to the success of highly active retroviral therapy (HAART), which has been shown to suppress viral replication, and slow disease progression. At least 95% adherence to the medication regimen is necessary to get the full benefit from HAART, yet about half of the people on HAART do not take the medications as prescribed. The purpose of this presentation is to explore personal and contextual factors that influence HIV-infected women's capacity to initiate and adhere to treatment regimens. A Feminist Narrative conceptual framework was used. The setting for this NIH funded qualitative study (#R01NR04840) was both urban and rural areas across the state of Wisconsin. Women were recruited using targeted chain referral sampling. The sample for this presentation was 14 women who had difficulty with HIV medication adherence, who participated in a larger longitudinal qualitative study of 55 racially and culturally diverse women with HIV. The design of the study was a repeated narrative interview design in which up to ten, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each woman over a two-year period. The instruments were baseline and prospective interview guides used to encourage women to tell their stories and describe their experiences as women who were HIV positive. Interviews of approximately 2 hours in length were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered into N-VIVO, a software program, to facilitate management and coding of these data. The coded interviews were analyzed using multistage narrative analysis. The findings suggest issues of non-adherence include perceptions that the side effects of the medication are indicators of serious harm being caused to the self, limited health literacy, weak relationships with providers, and inexperience with daily routines. The findings are relevant for assisting nurses to understand and effectively support women in managing the often difficult and uncomfortable HIV medication regimens.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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