Mentally Restorative Activities and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159036
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentally Restorative Activities and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders
Abstract:
Mentally Restorative Activities and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing - P.O. Box 4004, 105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA
Contact Telephone:715-836-5183
Mentally restorative activities are leisure-like experiences that range from simply looking out a window at a natural view, to participating in hobbies that absorb and interest a person, and are based on the Kaplan Attention Restoration theory. Participation in them has been associated with feelings of renewed energy, concentration, and mental clarity. Little literature exists regarding the benefits of restorative activities to community-dwelling elders, a group in need of means to promote optimal daily functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mentally restorative activities and the ability to manage daily life activities for a sample of 54 community-dwelling elders (34 women, 20 men; ages 65-87 years). The Restorative Activities Assessment (RAA), used to measure restorative activities, listed various activities that participants rated using two subscales: 1) Participation Frequency, "How often do you engage in these types of activities?"; and 2) Restorative Feelings, "To what extent do you feel restored (more mental energy, refreshed, rested, at peace) after engaging in these types of activities?". The Attentional Function Index was used to assess daily functioning performance on common activities requiring concentration; and the 5-item Geriatric Depression Scale was used to screen for depression. As theorized, the RAA Restorative Feelings subscale correlated significantly with daily functioning (r = .34) and with depressive symptoms (r = -.48): Elders who felt more restored after participating in the restorative activities also perceived themselves as performing better on daily tasks and reported fewer depressive symptoms. The RAA Participation Frequency subscale did not correlate significantly with daily functioning but was associated with depressive symptoms (r = -.40, p<.01). In conclusion, the simple frequency of participation in potentially restorative activities may be less important than the quality of and individual's preference for the activities and must be kept in mind when designing nursing interventions. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentally Restorative Activities and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159036-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentally Restorative Activities and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing - P.O. Box 4004, 105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">715-836-5183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jansenda@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mentally restorative activities are leisure-like experiences that range from simply looking out a window at a natural view, to participating in hobbies that absorb and interest a person, and are based on the Kaplan Attention Restoration theory. Participation in them has been associated with feelings of renewed energy, concentration, and mental clarity. Little literature exists regarding the benefits of restorative activities to community-dwelling elders, a group in need of means to promote optimal daily functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mentally restorative activities and the ability to manage daily life activities for a sample of 54 community-dwelling elders (34 women, 20 men; ages 65-87 years). The Restorative Activities Assessment (RAA), used to measure restorative activities, listed various activities that participants rated using two subscales: 1) Participation Frequency, &quot;How often do you engage in these types of activities?&quot;; and 2) Restorative Feelings, &quot;To what extent do you feel restored (more mental energy, refreshed, rested, at peace) after engaging in these types of activities?&quot;. The Attentional Function Index was used to assess daily functioning performance on common activities requiring concentration; and the 5-item Geriatric Depression Scale was used to screen for depression. As theorized, the RAA Restorative Feelings subscale correlated significantly with daily functioning (r = .34) and with depressive symptoms (r = -.48): Elders who felt more restored after participating in the restorative activities also perceived themselves as performing better on daily tasks and reported fewer depressive symptoms. The RAA Participation Frequency subscale did not correlate significantly with daily functioning but was associated with depressive symptoms (r = -.40, p&lt;.01). In conclusion, the simple frequency of participation in potentially restorative activities may be less important than the quality of and individual's preference for the activities and must be kept in mind when designing nursing interventions. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.