Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk in School-age Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159039
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk in School-age Children
Abstract:
Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk in School-age Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Keller, Vicki, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3400 Tillotson Ave., Muncie, IN, 47306-0265, USA
Contact Telephone:765-285-5569
Co-Authors:Kim Walker, MS; Renee Twibell, DNS, RN, Associate Professor; Kristine Larson, BSN, RN; Mary Rowlett, MA, RN, ABPP; Rosalyn Brown, MS, RN; and Tammy Phipps, BSN, RN
The purpose of this exploratory research study was to examine mothers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the cardiovascular risk of their school-age children. Recent research suggests that the risk for adult cardiovascular disease begins in childhood. Current nationwide initiatives encourage parents to support healthy lifestyles for children, including regular exercise and balanced nutrition. Nurses require evidence in order to support the prevention of cardiovascular disease and to guide the education of parents and children at risk. In a literature review, little research was found on parental perceptions related to the cardiovascular disease risk of children. There was a particular dearth of literature on the parental monitoring of cholesterol and blood pressure in school-age children. This study was conducted to explore perceptions of parents of at-risk children and create evidence to guide nurses who strive to teach parents about risk factors and monitoring behaviors. The convenience sample (n=7) consisted of mothers of children age 9-12 years who had a family history of cardiovascular disease before the age of 55 years. Respondents were Caucasian, and most worked in office settings for more than 20 hours per week. Data were collected through a focus group interview. Interview questions were guided by the Elaboration-Likelihood and Systematic-Heuristic Models of information processing theories. The interview was audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Spradley's (1979) dimensional analysis guided data analysis. Preliminary results of data analysis revealed four key findings. First, a child's obesity and family history were the primary risk indicators to mothers. Secondly, respondents did not recognize a need to monitor a child's cholesterol or blood pressure. Thirdly, mothers were reluctant to monitor cholesterol or blood pressure without a physician's recommendation. Fourthly, respondents expressed mild concern about labeling their children "at risk" and becoming overly obsessive about their diets. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk in School-age Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159039-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk in School-age Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keller, Vicki, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3400 Tillotson Ave., Muncie, IN, 47306-0265, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765-285-5569</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vekeller@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kim Walker, MS; Renee Twibell, DNS, RN, Associate Professor; Kristine Larson, BSN, RN; Mary Rowlett, MA, RN, ABPP; Rosalyn Brown, MS, RN; and Tammy Phipps, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this exploratory research study was to examine mothers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the cardiovascular risk of their school-age children. Recent research suggests that the risk for adult cardiovascular disease begins in childhood. Current nationwide initiatives encourage parents to support healthy lifestyles for children, including regular exercise and balanced nutrition. Nurses require evidence in order to support the prevention of cardiovascular disease and to guide the education of parents and children at risk. In a literature review, little research was found on parental perceptions related to the cardiovascular disease risk of children. There was a particular dearth of literature on the parental monitoring of cholesterol and blood pressure in school-age children. This study was conducted to explore perceptions of parents of at-risk children and create evidence to guide nurses who strive to teach parents about risk factors and monitoring behaviors. The convenience sample (n=7) consisted of mothers of children age 9-12 years who had a family history of cardiovascular disease before the age of 55 years. Respondents were Caucasian, and most worked in office settings for more than 20 hours per week. Data were collected through a focus group interview. Interview questions were guided by the Elaboration-Likelihood and Systematic-Heuristic Models of information processing theories. The interview was audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Spradley's (1979) dimensional analysis guided data analysis. Preliminary results of data analysis revealed four key findings. First, a child's obesity and family history were the primary risk indicators to mothers. Secondly, respondents did not recognize a need to monitor a child's cholesterol or blood pressure. Thirdly, mothers were reluctant to monitor cholesterol or blood pressure without a physician's recommendation. Fourthly, respondents expressed mild concern about labeling their children &quot;at risk&quot; and becoming overly obsessive about their diets. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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