Nurse Responses to Dementia Behaviors as Predictors of Recurrence of Dementia Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159042
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Responses to Dementia Behaviors as Predictors of Recurrence of Dementia Behaviors
Abstract:
Nurse Responses to Dementia Behaviors as Predictors of Recurrence of Dementia Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kovach, Christine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-6233
Co-Authors:Michelle Simpson, MS, RN, Research Assistant
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of nurse response to behaviors of people with advanced dementia and predict recurrence of resident behavioral symptoms based on type of nurse response. Theoretical Framework: The Consequences of Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior (C-NDB) theory explains that the behavioral expression of needs by people with advanced dementia can contribute to needs being unmet, worsening behaviors, new behaviors and new needs. Method: A total of 54 nurses and 112 residents with advanced dementia participated. For each subject, nurses recorded for 20 days four observations: 1) behaviors of subjects that initiated care; 2) assessments done in response to the behavior; 3) treatments given; and 4) the degree to which the behavioral symptom returned to baseline following assessments or treatments. Content analysis, descriptive and regression analysis were used to analyze data in this mixed method study. Results: Nurses responded to behaviors in four ways: dismissive (the nurse does no assessment or intervention); static (the nurse continues to utilize the same 1 or 2 assessment and/or intervention technique(s) over multiple days, even though ineffective); reactive (the nurse uses one or more treatments, but intervenes before completing a thorough assessment); and comprehensive (assessment of 3 or more domains plus one or more treatments). Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that reactive responses, after controlling for functional status and pretest behavior symptom profile significantly predicted recurrence of behavior. The model shows that 20.1% of the variance in behavioral symptom days is uniquely accounted for by the use of static responses (p < .001). Conclusions: Problems with care of nursing home residents with dementia include: a) failure to assess or intervene in response to behavior changes; b) intervention without adequate assessment; c) restricted scope of interventions; and d) failure to evaluate treatment and revise interventions based on the evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Responses to Dementia Behaviors as Predictors of Recurrence of Dementia Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159042-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Responses to Dementia Behaviors as Predictors of Recurrence of Dementia Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kovach, Christine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-6233</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ckovach@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michelle Simpson, MS, RN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of nurse response to behaviors of people with advanced dementia and predict recurrence of resident behavioral symptoms based on type of nurse response. Theoretical Framework: The Consequences of Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior (C-NDB) theory explains that the behavioral expression of needs by people with advanced dementia can contribute to needs being unmet, worsening behaviors, new behaviors and new needs. Method: A total of 54 nurses and 112 residents with advanced dementia participated. For each subject, nurses recorded for 20 days four observations: 1) behaviors of subjects that initiated care; 2) assessments done in response to the behavior; 3) treatments given; and 4) the degree to which the behavioral symptom returned to baseline following assessments or treatments. Content analysis, descriptive and regression analysis were used to analyze data in this mixed method study. Results: Nurses responded to behaviors in four ways: dismissive (the nurse does no assessment or intervention); static (the nurse continues to utilize the same 1 or 2 assessment and/or intervention technique(s) over multiple days, even though ineffective); reactive (the nurse uses one or more treatments, but intervenes before completing a thorough assessment); and comprehensive (assessment of 3 or more domains plus one or more treatments). Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that reactive responses, after controlling for functional status and pretest behavior symptom profile significantly predicted recurrence of behavior. The model shows that 20.1% of the variance in behavioral symptom days is uniquely accounted for by the use of static responses (p &lt; .001). Conclusions: Problems with care of nursing home residents with dementia include: a) failure to assess or intervene in response to behavior changes; b) intervention without adequate assessment; c) restricted scope of interventions; and d) failure to evaluate treatment and revise interventions based on the evaluation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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