2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159043
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Cognitive Representations of Illness: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Abstract:
Measuring Cognitive Representations of Illness: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kritpracha, Charuwan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkla University
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Hat-Yai, Songkla, 90110, Thailand
Contact Telephone:66-74-428401
Co-Authors:Lehto Rebecca, PhD, RN, OCN, Post Doctoral Fellow
Purpose: Over the past three decades, the conceptualization of cognitive representations as constructs to explain how people understand and respond to illness has gained popularity. A parallel interest in understanding how different cultures influence illness perceptions, formation of representations of illness, and subsequent adaptive behaviors has led to a wealth of possibilities for nursing inquiry and collaboration. The purpose of the study was to compare and contrast illness representations among two culturally distinct groups of cancer patients. Theoretical Framework: The study was based on self-regulation and cognitive map theory that emphasizes person-environment interactions in cognitive structure development. Subjects: 45 Thai women with breast cancer, 52 American men and women with suspected lung cancer. Method: The Conceptual Cognitive Map(3CM) is a method for measuring content and structure of cognitive representations. The 3CM procedure involved having participants think of important concepts about their illness, and to write each thought on a post-it note until their ideas were exhausted. The participants arranged the items in a meaningful way that was preserved. Subjects coded items with positive(+) signs or negative(-) signs for affect. Results were evaluated for content and structure via content analyses, frequency analyses, and developing categories based on related statements. Results: Findings demonstrated contents related to the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and controllability to be salient. Thai women were more likely to cite issues of causality. Both groups were more likely to code contents negatively, and both identified fears related to the diagnosis and death. Spiritual themes, optimism, positive coping, and social support were most common in the positively coded items. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that the 3CM has early useful application among different cultural groups newly diagnosed with cancer. Further, results suggest that structure of the illness representation is similar between two cultural groups facing cancer, whereas the contents were culturally specific.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Cognitive Representations of Illness: A Cross-Cultural Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159043-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Cognitive Representations of Illness: A Cross-Cultural Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kritpracha, Charuwan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkla University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Hat-Yai, Songkla, 90110, Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">66-74-428401</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">charuwan.kr@psu.ac.th</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lehto Rebecca, PhD, RN, OCN, Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Over the past three decades, the conceptualization of cognitive representations as constructs to explain how people understand and respond to illness has gained popularity. A parallel interest in understanding how different cultures influence illness perceptions, formation of representations of illness, and subsequent adaptive behaviors has led to a wealth of possibilities for nursing inquiry and collaboration. The purpose of the study was to compare and contrast illness representations among two culturally distinct groups of cancer patients. Theoretical Framework: The study was based on self-regulation and cognitive map theory that emphasizes person-environment interactions in cognitive structure development. Subjects: 45 Thai women with breast cancer, 52 American men and women with suspected lung cancer. Method: The Conceptual Cognitive Map(3CM) is a method for measuring content and structure of cognitive representations. The 3CM procedure involved having participants think of important concepts about their illness, and to write each thought on a post-it note until their ideas were exhausted. The participants arranged the items in a meaningful way that was preserved. Subjects coded items with positive(+) signs or negative(-) signs for affect. Results were evaluated for content and structure via content analyses, frequency analyses, and developing categories based on related statements. Results: Findings demonstrated contents related to the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and controllability to be salient. Thai women were more likely to cite issues of causality. Both groups were more likely to code contents negatively, and both identified fears related to the diagnosis and death. Spiritual themes, optimism, positive coping, and social support were most common in the positively coded items. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that the 3CM has early useful application among different cultural groups newly diagnosed with cancer. Further, results suggest that structure of the illness representation is similar between two cultural groups facing cancer, whereas the contents were culturally specific.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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