Learned Resourcefulness, Cognitive Processes, and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159044
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learned Resourcefulness, Cognitive Processes, and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults.
Abstract:
Learned Resourcefulness, Cognitive Processes, and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lai, Chien-Yu, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kaohsiung Medical University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, San Ming District, Kaohsiung City, 80708, Taiwan
Contact Telephone:886-7-312-1101 ext. 2631
Co-Authors:Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Diana L. Morris, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor; Noreen Brady, PhD, CNS, LPCC, Assistant Professor; and T. J. McCallum, PhD, Assistant Professor
Depression is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and worldwide. Depressed people frequently experience limitations in performing daily activities and increased psychosocial dysfunction in social relationships and occupational role. Consequently, the research budget for funding for studies of Major Depression has increased 89% from 1999 to 2003. According to Beck's cognitive theory of depression, disturbances in specific cognitive processes, which he identified as personal beliefs, lead to deficits in adaptive functioning in depression-prone individuals. However, Adler's social interest theory suggests that social interest, which is demonstrated through one's relationships with others, is an equally important cognitive process. However, both personal beliefs and social interest may differentially affect the depressed person's ability to function in daily activities and Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness theory proposes that the relationship between cognitive processes and adaptive functioning is influenced by learned resourcefulness. Purpose: This study examined an integrated model for predicting adaptive functioning, derived from Beck's, Adler's, and Rosenbaum's theories. Methods: A secondary analysis of two existing data sets consisting of 189 depressed adults, who were inpatients (n=63), never hospitalized outpatients (n=63), or previously hospitalized outpatients (n=63) was conducted to examine differences among the three groups of depressed adults on personal beliefs, social interest, learned resourcefulness, and adaptive functioning. Data analysis included one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results: Depressed inpatients' personal beliefs (F=7.30, p<.001), learned resourcefulness (F=9.17, p<.001), and adaptive functioning (F=9.76, p<.001) were all significantly lower than depressed outpatients. In testing the integrated model, no significant mediating or moderating effect by learned resourcefulness was found in the depressed adults. Conclusion: The results indicated a direct effect of learned resourcefulness on adaptive functioning, which validates the importance of resourcefulness for depressed adults and provides direction for designing nursing interventions including teaching resourcefulness skills to depressed adults in clinical and community settings. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearned Resourcefulness, Cognitive Processes, and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159044-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learned Resourcefulness, Cognitive Processes, and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lai, Chien-Yu, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaohsiung Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, San Ming District, Kaohsiung City, 80708, Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">886-7-312-1101 ext. 2631</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chien@kmu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Diana L. Morris, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor; Noreen Brady, PhD, CNS, LPCC, Assistant Professor; and T. J. McCallum, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and worldwide. Depressed people frequently experience limitations in performing daily activities and increased psychosocial dysfunction in social relationships and occupational role. Consequently, the research budget for funding for studies of Major Depression has increased 89% from 1999 to 2003. According to Beck's cognitive theory of depression, disturbances in specific cognitive processes, which he identified as personal beliefs, lead to deficits in adaptive functioning in depression-prone individuals. However, Adler's social interest theory suggests that social interest, which is demonstrated through one's relationships with others, is an equally important cognitive process. However, both personal beliefs and social interest may differentially affect the depressed person's ability to function in daily activities and Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness theory proposes that the relationship between cognitive processes and adaptive functioning is influenced by learned resourcefulness. Purpose: This study examined an integrated model for predicting adaptive functioning, derived from Beck's, Adler's, and Rosenbaum's theories. Methods: A secondary analysis of two existing data sets consisting of 189 depressed adults, who were inpatients (n=63), never hospitalized outpatients (n=63), or previously hospitalized outpatients (n=63) was conducted to examine differences among the three groups of depressed adults on personal beliefs, social interest, learned resourcefulness, and adaptive functioning. Data analysis included one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results: Depressed inpatients' personal beliefs (F=7.30, p&lt;.001), learned resourcefulness (F=9.17, p&lt;.001), and adaptive functioning (F=9.76, p&lt;.001) were all significantly lower than depressed outpatients. In testing the integrated model, no significant mediating or moderating effect by learned resourcefulness was found in the depressed adults. Conclusion: The results indicated a direct effect of learned resourcefulness on adaptive functioning, which validates the importance of resourcefulness for depressed adults and provides direction for designing nursing interventions including teaching resourcefulness skills to depressed adults in clinical and community settings. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:38:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:38:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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