Cancer Worries and Risk Perception in Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159047
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cancer Worries and Risk Perception in Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer
Abstract:
Cancer Worries and Risk Perception in Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, MS, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:Dean
Contact Address:College of Health Professions, 4001 W. McNichols - PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA
Contact Telephone:313-993-1208
Co-Authors:James J. Janisse, PhD, Assistant Professor; Robin Gold, MS, CGC, Research Coordinator; Michele Cichon, MS, CNE, Research Assistant; Michael Tainsky, PhD, Professor; Michael Simon, MD, MPH, Director; Lisa Berry-Bobovski, BS, Associate Director; and Jeanett
With 5-10% of breast and ovarian cancer attributed to an inherited mutation gene, such as BRCA1/2, cancer survivors live with the reality of elevated cancer risk for themselves and other family members. While an individual will often overestimate their personal cancer risk, there has been little research on examining families together regarding their cancer worries and perception of risk for breast/ovarian cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine what variables may be predictive of survivor and family member appraisal of inherited cancer risk, measured by cancer worries and perception of risk. A secondary purpose was to determine any interaction effect between survivors and their family members. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was conducted with 146 breast and/or ovarian cancer survivors and 146 unaffected female relatives (N=292). Using the transtheoretical model of change and a family stress framework, a population-based sample, stratified by race (Caucasian and African-American) and by diagnosis (breast and ovarian), was randomly selected from a NCI SEER Cancer Registry in the Midwest. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: family history of cancer, coping styles, knowledge of cancer risk, self-efficacy, family communication, social support, perception of cancer risk, cancer worries, and decision-making. Dyadic analyses included descriptive statistics and hierarchical linear modeling to evaluate the interaction effect between members of the dyad. Results indicated a strong relationship between family members' cancer worries, with age, education, marital status, and decision to seek cancer information predictive of both family members' cancer worries. Additionally, family communication, race, and knowledge of cancer risk were predictive of both individuals' perception of risk. Further research on exploring inherited cancer risk from a family perspective is essential in order to develop interventions to address cancer worries and risk perceptions for family members who may potentially be at risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCancer Worries and Risk Perception in Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159047-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cancer Worries and Risk Perception in Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, MS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Health Professions, 4001 W. McNichols - PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-993-1208</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mellonsk@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James J. Janisse, PhD, Assistant Professor; Robin Gold, MS, CGC, Research Coordinator; Michele Cichon, MS, CNE, Research Assistant; Michael Tainsky, PhD, Professor; Michael Simon, MD, MPH, Director; Lisa Berry-Bobovski, BS, Associate Director; and Jeanett</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With 5-10% of breast and ovarian cancer attributed to an inherited mutation gene, such as BRCA1/2, cancer survivors live with the reality of elevated cancer risk for themselves and other family members. While an individual will often overestimate their personal cancer risk, there has been little research on examining families together regarding their cancer worries and perception of risk for breast/ovarian cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine what variables may be predictive of survivor and family member appraisal of inherited cancer risk, measured by cancer worries and perception of risk. A secondary purpose was to determine any interaction effect between survivors and their family members. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was conducted with 146 breast and/or ovarian cancer survivors and 146 unaffected female relatives (N=292). Using the transtheoretical model of change and a family stress framework, a population-based sample, stratified by race (Caucasian and African-American) and by diagnosis (breast and ovarian), was randomly selected from a NCI SEER Cancer Registry in the Midwest. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: family history of cancer, coping styles, knowledge of cancer risk, self-efficacy, family communication, social support, perception of cancer risk, cancer worries, and decision-making. Dyadic analyses included descriptive statistics and hierarchical linear modeling to evaluate the interaction effect between members of the dyad. Results indicated a strong relationship between family members' cancer worries, with age, education, marital status, and decision to seek cancer information predictive of both family members' cancer worries. Additionally, family communication, race, and knowledge of cancer risk were predictive of both individuals' perception of risk. Further research on exploring inherited cancer risk from a family perspective is essential in order to develop interventions to address cancer worries and risk perceptions for family members who may potentially be at risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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