Depressive symptoms, family functioning and social support in grandmother caregivers across one year

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159049
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive symptoms, family functioning and social support in grandmother caregivers across one year
Abstract:
Depressive symptoms, family functioning and social support in grandmother caregivers across one year
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Musil, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-4700
Co-Authors:Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director; Alexandra Jeanblanc, MA; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and May L Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean
The association between depressive symptoms in maternal caregivers and problems in family functioning has been previously identified, but this association has not been examined relative to grandmothers who are caregivers to grandchildren, nor has it been examined longitudinally. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress guided this two-wave longitudinal analysis in which caregiving to grandchildren and social support were expected to impact the depression-family functioning relationship. Data obtained at two time points, one year apart, by mailed questionnaires from a sample (random and convenience) of 440 Ohio grandmothers with varying caregiving responsibility to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multigenerational homes, and non-caregivers to grandchildren) were analyzed using a longitudinal SEM model with AMOS 5.0.

The relationships between support, family functioning and depressive symptoms appears to be stable across time waves (CFI=.97, TLI=.95). The largest predictors for the Time 2 variables were their Time 1 values. Primary caregivers to grandchildren had less subjective and instrumental support, but raising a grandchild did not directly affect other variables in the model. Within each time wave, current subjective support reduced symptoms of depression and perceived problems in family functioning. Higher subjective support in Time 2 was predicted by higher instrumental support and fewer depressive symptoms at Time 1, in addition to subjective support from the previous wave. The correlation between family functioning and depressive symptoms was present in both waves, but was smaller at Time 2 because depressive symptoms showed a greater change over the year-long interval.

The consistency of these processes has implications for nurses working with grandmothers who are caregivers to grandchildren and their families. The beneficial effects of social support on depressive symptoms and perceptions about one's family functioning suggest important areas for intervention with these women and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive symptoms, family functioning and social support in grandmother caregivers across one yearen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159049-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressive symptoms, family functioning and social support in grandmother caregivers across one year</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-4700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmm4@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Camille Warner, PhD, Project Director; Alexandra Jeanblanc, MA; Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Associate Dean; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and May L Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The association between depressive symptoms in maternal caregivers and problems in family functioning has been previously identified, but this association has not been examined relative to grandmothers who are caregivers to grandchildren, nor has it been examined longitudinally. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress guided this two-wave longitudinal analysis in which caregiving to grandchildren and social support were expected to impact the depression-family functioning relationship. Data obtained at two time points, one year apart, by mailed questionnaires from a sample (random and convenience) of 440 Ohio grandmothers with varying caregiving responsibility to grandchildren (grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers in multigenerational homes, and non-caregivers to grandchildren) were analyzed using a longitudinal SEM model with AMOS 5.0.<br/><br/>The relationships between support, family functioning and depressive symptoms appears to be stable across time waves (CFI=.97, TLI=.95). The largest predictors for the Time 2 variables were their Time 1 values. Primary caregivers to grandchildren had less subjective and instrumental support, but raising a grandchild did not directly affect other variables in the model. Within each time wave, current subjective support reduced symptoms of depression and perceived problems in family functioning. Higher subjective support in Time 2 was predicted by higher instrumental support and fewer depressive symptoms at Time 1, in addition to subjective support from the previous wave. The correlation between family functioning and depressive symptoms was present in both waves, but was smaller at Time 2 because depressive symptoms showed a greater change over the year-long interval. <br/><br/>The consistency of these processes has implications for nurses working with grandmothers who are caregivers to grandchildren and their families. The beneficial effects of social support on depressive symptoms and perceptions about one's family functioning suggest important areas for intervention with these women and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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