Symptom Perception and Adherence to Controller Medications Among Adults with Asthma

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159050
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Perception and Adherence to Controller Medications Among Adults with Asthma
Abstract:
Symptom Perception and Adherence to Controller Medications Among Adults with Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ohm, Ruth, PhD, ARNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Baker University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3006 SW Staffordshire Road, Topeka, KS, 66614, USA
Contact Telephone:(785)478-0222
Co-Authors:Lauren S. Aaronson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Adherence to daily medication regimens and adjustment of medications to respiratory changes are essential for positive health outcomes for patients with asthma. The inability to accurately perceive decreasing lung function may prevent timely intervention. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between asthma symptom perception, illness perception, and adherence to controller medications, and to explore variables that may contribute to poor symptom perception. Teel's (1997) Symptom Interpretation Model (SIM) served as a guide to identify predictors of perceptual accuracy. 120 adult asthma patients of asthma specialty clinics, taking Advair as a controller medication, were enrolled in this cross-sectional descriptive study. 97 subjects completed four weeks of daily diaries that assessed subjective symptom perception on a 10-point numeric rating scales (NRS) and measured peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) twice daily. Individual perceptual accuracy scores (PAS-intensity) were determined by correlations of the NRS scores with the PEFRs. Measurements included demographics; adherence, measured by the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and Advair dose count (percent of doses taken/doses prescribed); and illness perception (Illness Perception Questionnaire û Revised) and a single-item indicator of perceived asthma severity. Results of independent t-tests comparing adherence rates of good versus poor perceivers (poor perception defined as a PAS-intensity r > - 0.3) were not significant. Mean adherence rate as measured by Advair dose count was 90.16%. Multiple regression analyses reveal that years with asthma, illness identity (personal control and treatment efficacy, consequences, and timeline-cyclical subscales of the IPQ-R) and peak flow variability are significant variables that may contribute to perceptual accuracy (PAS-intensity). Conclusion: There does not appear to be a strong relationship between adherence to controller medications and perceptual accuracy. Clinical assessment of a patient's illness identity may help tailor interventions appropriate to the individual's needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Perception and Adherence to Controller Medications Among Adults with Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159050-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Perception and Adherence to Controller Medications Among Adults with Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ohm, Ruth, PhD, ARNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Baker University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3006 SW Staffordshire Road, Topeka, KS, 66614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(785)478-0222</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ruthohm@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lauren S. Aaronson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adherence to daily medication regimens and adjustment of medications to respiratory changes are essential for positive health outcomes for patients with asthma. The inability to accurately perceive decreasing lung function may prevent timely intervention. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between asthma symptom perception, illness perception, and adherence to controller medications, and to explore variables that may contribute to poor symptom perception. Teel's (1997) Symptom Interpretation Model (SIM) served as a guide to identify predictors of perceptual accuracy. 120 adult asthma patients of asthma specialty clinics, taking Advair as a controller medication, were enrolled in this cross-sectional descriptive study. 97 subjects completed four weeks of daily diaries that assessed subjective symptom perception on a 10-point numeric rating scales (NRS) and measured peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) twice daily. Individual perceptual accuracy scores (PAS-intensity) were determined by correlations of the NRS scores with the PEFRs. Measurements included demographics; adherence, measured by the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and Advair dose count (percent of doses taken/doses prescribed); and illness perception (Illness Perception Questionnaire &ucirc; Revised) and a single-item indicator of perceived asthma severity. Results of independent t-tests comparing adherence rates of good versus poor perceivers (poor perception defined as a PAS-intensity r &gt; - 0.3) were not significant. Mean adherence rate as measured by Advair dose count was 90.16%. Multiple regression analyses reveal that years with asthma, illness identity (personal control and treatment efficacy, consequences, and timeline-cyclical subscales of the IPQ-R) and peak flow variability are significant variables that may contribute to perceptual accuracy (PAS-intensity). Conclusion: There does not appear to be a strong relationship between adherence to controller medications and perceptual accuracy. Clinical assessment of a patient's illness identity may help tailor interventions appropriate to the individual's needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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