2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159052
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Discrimination and Physician Trust in African American Patients with Hypertension
Abstract:
Discrimination and Physician Trust in African American Patients with Hypertension
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Peters, Rosalind, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON - Room 358 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-0342
Co-Authors:Ramona Benkert, PhD, APRN, Assistant Professor; Rodney Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; and Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow
Problem: Significant racial disparities are noted in the onset, prevalence, and consequences of hypertension among African Americans. Hypertension health disparities have been linked to discriminatory treatment, systemic racism, cultural mistrust, and lack of trust in physicians. Yet studies examining physician trust have been done on predominantly non-Hispanic White populations, and no studies have been found to examine the relationships among these variables in an African American population. Purpose: To determine the inter-relationships of measures of discrimination (racism and cultural mistrust) and trust in physicians among African Americans. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study was conducted with a sample of 150 urban dwelling, low income African Americans. Subjects were well distributed by age, gender, and educational status. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scale (RaLES), Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), and Trust in Physician Scale (TPS). Cronbach's alphas on all scales ranged from .81 - .94 Findings: CMI and RaLES were strongly, positively associated (0.587 p = 0.01) There were significant, moderate inverse relationships between CMI and TPS (0.62 p = 0.01) and RaLES with TPS (0.305 p = 0.01). There were/ were no gender and age differences noted on any of the scales. Discussion: The magnitude of the correlation between RaLES and CMI suggests that the aspects of discrimination as measured by each instrument are related but not redundant, and that there are underlying different concepts. The relationships between the measures of discrimination and physician trust were significant and in the predicted direction. The measures provide options for the assessment of discrimination in health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiscrimination and Physician Trust in African American Patients with Hypertensionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159052-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Discrimination and Physician Trust in African American Patients with Hypertension</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Room 358 Cohn Building, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-0342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rpeters@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ramona Benkert, PhD, APRN, Assistant Professor; Rodney Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; and Nutrena Tate, MSN, Pre-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Significant racial disparities are noted in the onset, prevalence, and consequences of hypertension among African Americans. Hypertension health disparities have been linked to discriminatory treatment, systemic racism, cultural mistrust, and lack of trust in physicians. Yet studies examining physician trust have been done on predominantly non-Hispanic White populations, and no studies have been found to examine the relationships among these variables in an African American population. Purpose: To determine the inter-relationships of measures of discrimination (racism and cultural mistrust) and trust in physicians among African Americans. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study was conducted with a sample of 150 urban dwelling, low income African Americans. Subjects were well distributed by age, gender, and educational status. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scale (RaLES), Cultural Mistrust Inventory (CMI), and Trust in Physician Scale (TPS). Cronbach's alphas on all scales ranged from .81 - .94 Findings: CMI and RaLES were strongly, positively associated (0.587 p = 0.01) There were significant, moderate inverse relationships between CMI and TPS (0.62 p = 0.01) and RaLES with TPS (0.305 p = 0.01). There were/ were no gender and age differences noted on any of the scales. Discussion: The magnitude of the correlation between RaLES and CMI suggests that the aspects of discrimination as measured by each instrument are related but not redundant, and that there are underlying different concepts. The relationships between the measures of discrimination and physician trust were significant and in the predicted direction. The measures provide options for the assessment of discrimination in health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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