2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159053
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Errors in Hospitalized Older Adults
Abstract:
Medication Errors in Hospitalized Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Picone, Debra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 200 Hawkins Drive RM T100 GH, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-384-9098
Co-Authors:Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; Rui Qin, MS; and Taikyoung Kim, MS
Purpose: To examine factors that predict medication errors in hospitalized older adults who are at risk for falling or have the nursing treatment of Fall Prevention.

Conceptual Framework: Derived from Kane's work (1997), patient outcomes of acute care services are influenced by the characteristics of the patient, their clinical condition, the treatments they receive, and the context in which care is delivered.

Subjects: Inclusion criteria were equal to or more than 60 years of age, admitted for acute care services over 30 months (July 1998 through December 31, 2001), at risk for falling, or receiving the nursing treatment of Fall Prevention. The majority were Caucasian (92.8%), female (52.6%), and married (53.2%) with mean age of 73.7 years (60-103 years).

Methods: A nursing outcomes effectiveness database was developed from 9 clinical and operational data repositories from an acute care tertiary hospital in the Midwest. 10,187 hospitalizations were extracted from this database reflecting care delivered. Hospitalizations were the unit of analysis. Using Generalized Estimating Equation Models, 254 variables were initially analyzed and data reduced within each conceptual area (e.g. patient characteristics). Using a four stage analytic process, the final model retained only those variables that were significantly associated with medication errors.

Results: Seven percent of hospitalizations resulted in a medication error with the majority being transcription and omission errors. Types of medications errors most likely involved "high alert drugs." Predictors of medication errors were polypharmacy, medication type, certain medical and nursing treatments, and characteristics of the nursing unit. Examples of significant medical and nursing treatments included physical therapy and Pressure Ulcer Care, respectively.

Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that automated systems such as electronic medication administration systems, CPOE, and decision support may be helpful in reducing errors. Special attention and procedures for high-risk medication administration are warranted, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to reduce polypharmacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Errors in Hospitalized Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159053-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Errors in Hospitalized Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Picone, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 200 Hawkins Drive RM T100 GH, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-384-9098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debra-picone@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN; Rui Qin, MS; and Taikyoung Kim, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine factors that predict medication errors in hospitalized older adults who are at risk for falling or have the nursing treatment of Fall Prevention. <br/><br/>Conceptual Framework: Derived from Kane's work (1997), patient outcomes of acute care services are influenced by the characteristics of the patient, their clinical condition, the treatments they receive, and the context in which care is delivered. <br/><br/>Subjects: Inclusion criteria were equal to or more than 60 years of age, admitted for acute care services over 30 months (July 1998 through December 31, 2001), at risk for falling, or receiving the nursing treatment of Fall Prevention. The majority were Caucasian (92.8%), female (52.6%), and married (53.2%) with mean age of 73.7 years (60-103 years). <br/><br/>Methods: A nursing outcomes effectiveness database was developed from 9 clinical and operational data repositories from an acute care tertiary hospital in the Midwest. 10,187 hospitalizations were extracted from this database reflecting care delivered. Hospitalizations were the unit of analysis. Using Generalized Estimating Equation Models, 254 variables were initially analyzed and data reduced within each conceptual area (e.g. patient characteristics). Using a four stage analytic process, the final model retained only those variables that were significantly associated with medication errors. <br/><br/>Results: Seven percent of hospitalizations resulted in a medication error with the majority being transcription and omission errors. Types of medications errors most likely involved &quot;high alert drugs.&quot; Predictors of medication errors were polypharmacy, medication type, certain medical and nursing treatments, and characteristics of the nursing unit. Examples of significant medical and nursing treatments included physical therapy and Pressure Ulcer Care, respectively.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that automated systems such as electronic medication administration systems, CPOE, and decision support may be helpful in reducing errors. Special attention and procedures for high-risk medication administration are warranted, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to reduce polypharmacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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