2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159054
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue Representations in Women with Chronic Heart Failure
Abstract:
Fatigue Representations in Women with Chronic Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Plach, Sandra, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON - Cunningham Hall, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414 229 6920
Co-Authors:Susan M. Heidrich, PhD, RN, Professor
Successful self-care for persons with chronic heart failure (CHF) depends on the accurate recognition of symptoms to facilitate early intervention, decrease unnecessary hospitalizations, and maintain life quality. Beliefs about symptoms (called representations) are linked to self-care behaviors. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to describe women's representations of one CHF symptom, fatigue, and examine their relationship to health care utilization, psychological wellûbeing, and age. We chose fatigue because it is a frequent, debilitating symptom of CHF but can be attributed to many conditions. Participants were 169 community-dwelling women with CHF, aged 40 to 93, recruited from physician offices and clinics. Women completed survey questionnaires measuring representations [Symptom Representation Questionnaire (SRQ)], health care utilization, and psychological well-being. Mean scores for the SRQ indicated that women, particularly those in poorer health, agreed that their fatigue was chronic, caused by heart failure, and has serious consequences. They did not agree that their fatigue causes emotional distress. Midlife women reported significantly more severe consequences and emotional distress from fatigue than older women. Higher levels of emotional distress due to fatigue were significantly associated more physician visits (r = .31), emergency department visits (r=.25), and hospitalizations (r=.23). More emotional distress, more perceived chronicity, and more severe perceived consequences of fatigue were significantly associated with more depression and anxiety, and lower levels of purpose in life and self-acceptance. In multiple regression analyses, believing that fatigue has serious consequences was a significant predictor of depression (beta = .39, p < .001), anxiety (beta = -.20, p = .03), and purpose in life (beta = .22, p = .03). Because representations are related to psychological health and health care utilization, the efficacy of nursing interventions in CHF may be increased by attending to patients' representations of their symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue Representations in Women with Chronic Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159054-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue Representations in Women with Chronic Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plach, Sandra, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Cunningham Hall, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414 229 6920</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">placs@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Heidrich, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Successful self-care for persons with chronic heart failure (CHF) depends on the accurate recognition of symptoms to facilitate early intervention, decrease unnecessary hospitalizations, and maintain life quality. Beliefs about symptoms (called representations) are linked to self-care behaviors. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to describe women's representations of one CHF symptom, fatigue, and examine their relationship to health care utilization, psychological well&ucirc;being, and age. We chose fatigue because it is a frequent, debilitating symptom of CHF but can be attributed to many conditions. Participants were 169 community-dwelling women with CHF, aged 40 to 93, recruited from physician offices and clinics. Women completed survey questionnaires measuring representations [Symptom Representation Questionnaire (SRQ)], health care utilization, and psychological well-being. Mean scores for the SRQ indicated that women, particularly those in poorer health, agreed that their fatigue was chronic, caused by heart failure, and has serious consequences. They did not agree that their fatigue causes emotional distress. Midlife women reported significantly more severe consequences and emotional distress from fatigue than older women. Higher levels of emotional distress due to fatigue were significantly associated more physician visits (r = .31), emergency department visits (r=.25), and hospitalizations (r=.23). More emotional distress, more perceived chronicity, and more severe perceived consequences of fatigue were significantly associated with more depression and anxiety, and lower levels of purpose in life and self-acceptance. In multiple regression analyses, believing that fatigue has serious consequences was a significant predictor of depression (beta = .39, p &lt; .001), anxiety (beta = -.20, p = .03), and purpose in life (beta = .22, p = .03). Because representations are related to psychological health and health care utilization, the efficacy of nursing interventions in CHF may be increased by attending to patients' representations of their symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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