2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159056
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hyperalgesia is experienced by older adults after total knee replacement (TKR)
Abstract:
Hyperalgesia is experienced by older adults after total knee replacement (TKR)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rakel, Barbara, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 50 Newton Rd., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7036
Co-Authors:Timothy Brennan, PhD, MD, Associate Professor; Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Linda Fink, MSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Ann Reisselman, BSN
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) if hyperalgesia measurements are tolerated by older adults preoperatively and immediately postoperative; 2) if tolerated measurements provide sensitive data for evaluating hyperalgesia; and 3) if these measurements correlate to pain with movement. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pain with movement is different from pain at rest and more difficult to control after surgery. Evidence suggests that postoperative hyperalgesia influences pain with movement but not pain at rest and that advanced age is associated with a reduction in the capacity to modulate the hyperalgesic response. This puts older adults at an increased risk of delayed ambulation and flexion caused by pain with movement after TKR. Method/Subjects: A descriptive, pre/post design was used with control comparisons. Area, pain thresholds, pain intensities to heat and force stimuli, pain at rest, and pain with movement were tested on 24 subjects with osteoarthritis (mean age = 68.46 yrs) before and after TKR. Results: All measurements were tolerated and demonstrated an increased hyperalgesic response at the knee after surgery (area p<.05, heat thresholds p<.05, force thresholds p<.05, and pain intensities to heat p=.001 and force p<.001). Pain at the knee during active flexion was significantly higher than pain at rest (p<.001) but no significant correlation was found between hyperalgesia measurements and pain during active flexion. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia measurements were tolerated by older adults and demonstrated a hyperalgesic response around the knee after TKR. Pain intensities to heat and force established a stronger hyperalgesic response than heat and force pain thresholds. Hyperalgesia measurements did not correlate to pain with movement. This may be due to an inadequate sample size and consistently high pain ratings during active flexion that may not have provided adequate variability to determine a relationship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHyperalgesia is experienced by older adults after total knee replacement (TKR)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159056-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hyperalgesia is experienced by older adults after total knee replacement (TKR)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rakel, Barbara, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 50 Newton Rd., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara-rakel@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Timothy Brennan, PhD, MD, Associate Professor; Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Linda Fink, MSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Ann Reisselman, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) if hyperalgesia measurements are tolerated by older adults preoperatively and immediately postoperative; 2) if tolerated measurements provide sensitive data for evaluating hyperalgesia; and 3) if these measurements correlate to pain with movement. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Pain with movement is different from pain at rest and more difficult to control after surgery. Evidence suggests that postoperative hyperalgesia influences pain with movement but not pain at rest and that advanced age is associated with a reduction in the capacity to modulate the hyperalgesic response. This puts older adults at an increased risk of delayed ambulation and flexion caused by pain with movement after TKR. Method/Subjects: A descriptive, pre/post design was used with control comparisons. Area, pain thresholds, pain intensities to heat and force stimuli, pain at rest, and pain with movement were tested on 24 subjects with osteoarthritis (mean age = 68.46 yrs) before and after TKR. Results: All measurements were tolerated and demonstrated an increased hyperalgesic response at the knee after surgery (area p&lt;.05, heat thresholds p&lt;.05, force thresholds p&lt;.05, and pain intensities to heat p=.001 and force p&lt;.001). Pain at the knee during active flexion was significantly higher than pain at rest (p&lt;.001) but no significant correlation was found between hyperalgesia measurements and pain during active flexion. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia measurements were tolerated by older adults and demonstrated a hyperalgesic response around the knee after TKR. Pain intensities to heat and force established a stronger hyperalgesic response than heat and force pain thresholds. Hyperalgesia measurements did not correlate to pain with movement. This may be due to an inadequate sample size and consistently high pain ratings during active flexion that may not have provided adequate variability to determine a relationship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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