Relationships Between Perinatal Abuse and Women's Contributions to and Knowledge of Family Income

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships Between Perinatal Abuse and Women's Contributions to and Knowledge of Family Income
Abstract:
Relationships Between Perinatal Abuse and Women's Contributions to and Knowledge of Family Income
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Renker, Paula, PhD, RN, C
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON - 342 Newton Hall, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614-292-4513
Purpose: The objective of this presentation is to discuss the relationship between differential effects of income and the prevalence of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in pregnant women.

Conceptual Framework: Heise's Integrated Ecological Framework directs the relationship between personal, situational, and sociocultural factors included in this research.

Participants: Five hundred and nineteen newly delivered postpartum women participated in this study. Participants were primarily African American and White women who were educationally and economically diverse and ranged in age from 16-24.

Methods: The audio computer assisted self interview (ACASI) used in this research was developed by the PI. Sections of the interview pertinent to this presentation included the prevalence of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in the year before and during pregnancy and demographic information. Participants were asked to identify if they knew the amount of income available to their family, total family income, and their contribution to family income.

Results: The sample was relatively evenly divided between 4 income strata with slightly more (27%) women falling in the less than $30,000 (lowest) stratum than the top stratum (19%) of >$80,000. The majority of participants contributed less than half of their household income. Approximately 10% of the sample indicated that they did not know their contribution to, nor their knowledge of, their total family income. While significant indirect relationships were identified between abuse and income, direct relationships were found between contribution to income and abuse and not knowing family income and abuse.

Conclusions: The findings in this study do not support the current practice of ôred flaggingö women who are of low income and of minority ethnicity for violence screening and intervention. All women, regardless of total family income, should be screened for abuse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships Between Perinatal Abuse and Women's Contributions to and Knowledge of Family Incomeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships Between Perinatal Abuse and Women's Contributions to and Knowledge of Family Income</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renker, Paula, PhD, RN, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - 342 Newton Hall, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-292-4513</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">renker.6@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The objective of this presentation is to discuss the relationship between differential effects of income and the prevalence of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in pregnant women. <br/><br/>Conceptual Framework: Heise's Integrated Ecological Framework directs the relationship between personal, situational, and sociocultural factors included in this research.<br/><br/>Participants: Five hundred and nineteen newly delivered postpartum women participated in this study. Participants were primarily African American and White women who were educationally and economically diverse and ranged in age from 16-24.<br/><br/>Methods: The audio computer assisted self interview (ACASI) used in this research was developed by the PI. Sections of the interview pertinent to this presentation included the prevalence of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in the year before and during pregnancy and demographic information. Participants were asked to identify if they knew the amount of income available to their family, total family income, and their contribution to family income.<br/><br/>Results: The sample was relatively evenly divided between 4 income strata with slightly more (27%) women falling in the less than $30,000 (lowest) stratum than the top stratum (19%) of &gt;$80,000. The majority of participants contributed less than half of their household income. Approximately 10% of the sample indicated that they did not know their contribution to, nor their knowledge of, their total family income. While significant indirect relationships were identified between abuse and income, direct relationships were found between contribution to income and abuse and not knowing family income and abuse. <br/><br/>Conclusions: The findings in this study do not support the current practice of &ocirc;red flagging&ouml; women who are of low income and of minority ethnicity for violence screening and intervention. All women, regardless of total family income, should be screened for abuse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.