2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159062
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Lived Experience of Sexually Compulsive/Addictive Behavior
Abstract:
Women's Lived Experience of Sexually Compulsive/Addictive Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Roller, Cyndi, MSN, WHNP, CNM, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8823
Background: Addiction in women is a growing problem in the United States. Two million women use illegal drugs and 4.4 million women are alcoholics. There is a strong connection between substance abuse and sexual activity in women. Sexually compulsive/addictive behavior (SCAB) is defined as out-of-control sexual behavior that causes distress and/or impairment of social functioning with loss of control over one's ability to make choices about sexual behavior. Consequences include: unplanned pregnancies, abortions, sexually transmitted infections, severe depression, intense anxiety, and low self-esteem.

Purpose: To explore women's lived experience of SCAB. The research question: what was your experience of living with SCAB?

Sample: Women between 18 - 50 years of age, who are sexually active, and participate in twelve step meeting groups including: Sex & love addicts anonymous, Sex addicts anonymous, and Sexaholics Anonymous were recruited for this study. Due to the sensitive nature of the subject, only 2 women agreed to face-to-face interviews. Also included were 18 self-reports of women's personal stories of their experience of SCAB published in The Augustine Fellowship Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous' Journal.

Design: Descriptive phenomenology was used in this pilot study. Colazzi's data analysis was used to extrapolate the meaning of the experience.

Results: Five dominant themes were identified: Childhood trauma, emotional distress, compulsion, addiction, and negative self-image

Findings: Based on this pilot study women who suffer from SCAB have experienced childhood trauma and emotional distress. They have negative self-image and often reenact their childhood trauma which manifests as sexually compulsive/addictive behavior.

Relevance: Women with SCAB pose a serious health threat to themselves, their families, and their communities. Nursing knowledge generated from this study will expand the limited research base on women with SCAB. Results will be utilized for instrument development and intervention strategies to assist nurses diagnose, refer, and treat these women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Lived Experience of Sexually Compulsive/Addictive Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159062-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Lived Experience of Sexually Compulsive/Addictive Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roller, Cyndi, MSN, WHNP, CNM, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8823</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">croller@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Addiction in women is a growing problem in the United States. Two million women use illegal drugs and 4.4 million women are alcoholics. There is a strong connection between substance abuse and sexual activity in women. Sexually compulsive/addictive behavior (SCAB) is defined as out-of-control sexual behavior that causes distress and/or impairment of social functioning with loss of control over one's ability to make choices about sexual behavior. Consequences include: unplanned pregnancies, abortions, sexually transmitted infections, severe depression, intense anxiety, and low self-esteem. <br/><br/>Purpose: To explore women's lived experience of SCAB. The research question: what was your experience of living with SCAB? <br/><br/>Sample: Women between 18 - 50 years of age, who are sexually active, and participate in twelve step meeting groups including: Sex &amp; love addicts anonymous, Sex addicts anonymous, and Sexaholics Anonymous were recruited for this study. Due to the sensitive nature of the subject, only 2 women agreed to face-to-face interviews. Also included were 18 self-reports of women's personal stories of their experience of SCAB published in The Augustine Fellowship Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous' Journal. <br/><br/>Design: Descriptive phenomenology was used in this pilot study. Colazzi's data analysis was used to extrapolate the meaning of the experience. <br/><br/>Results: Five dominant themes were identified: Childhood trauma, emotional distress, compulsion, addiction, and negative self-image<br/><br/>Findings: Based on this pilot study women who suffer from SCAB have experienced childhood trauma and emotional distress. They have negative self-image and often reenact their childhood trauma which manifests as sexually compulsive/addictive behavior.<br/><br/>Relevance: Women with SCAB pose a serious health threat to themselves, their families, and their communities. Nursing knowledge generated from this study will expand the limited research base on women with SCAB. Results will be utilized for instrument development and intervention strategies to assist nurses diagnose, refer, and treat these women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:39:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:39:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.