2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159063
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student Employment and Academic Achievement
Abstract:
Student Employment and Academic Achievement
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Schoofs, Nancy, PhD, RN, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 301 Michigan N.E., Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA
Contact Telephone:616-331-3516
Co-Authors:Susan Bosold, PhD, MS, MA, RN, Faculty
Student Employment and Academic Achievement There appears to be an increasing trend for nursing students to work full or part-time while attending college. Many faculty members are convinced that this trend is detrimental to nursing students and their academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to investigate how employment affects nursing students' academic achievement and perceptions of future employment. A modified model of Astin's (1984) Theory of Involvement was applied to this study. A convenience sample of participants was composed of the nursing students currently enrolled in all levels of BSN nursing classes in a large nursing program at a Midwest university. Surveys were distributed and included items concerning demographic information as well as academic and work characteristics. Constant comparative analysis was applied to the data obtained from phone interviews. Although 13 of our 14 interviewees indicated that employment did have an impact on their academic standing, it was not enough of an impact to significantly lower their GPA according to the statistical findings. Descriptive statistics were used for the data from the surveys. Differences were found when all of the students' results were divided into two groups of those working 20 or less hours/week and those working more than 20 hours/week. For the latter group, we found students who were more than likely to be older, male, taking less credits, and to be a second degree student. The results of this research will impact policy affecting administrators, faculty, and advisors at schools of nursing, with recommendations for incoming nursing students. Comparing these findings to those at a community college or private four-year college would add to the literature on how student employment affects academic achievement. Key words: students, employment, academics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent Employment and Academic Achievementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159063-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student Employment and Academic Achievement</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schoofs, Nancy, PhD, RN, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 301 Michigan N.E., Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-331-3516</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schoofsn@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Bosold, PhD, MS, MA, RN, Faculty</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Student Employment and Academic Achievement There appears to be an increasing trend for nursing students to work full or part-time while attending college. Many faculty members are convinced that this trend is detrimental to nursing students and their academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to investigate how employment affects nursing students' academic achievement and perceptions of future employment. A modified model of Astin's (1984) Theory of Involvement was applied to this study. A convenience sample of participants was composed of the nursing students currently enrolled in all levels of BSN nursing classes in a large nursing program at a Midwest university. Surveys were distributed and included items concerning demographic information as well as academic and work characteristics. Constant comparative analysis was applied to the data obtained from phone interviews. Although 13 of our 14 interviewees indicated that employment did have an impact on their academic standing, it was not enough of an impact to significantly lower their GPA according to the statistical findings. Descriptive statistics were used for the data from the surveys. Differences were found when all of the students' results were divided into two groups of those working 20 or less hours/week and those working more than 20 hours/week. For the latter group, we found students who were more than likely to be older, male, taking less credits, and to be a second degree student. The results of this research will impact policy affecting administrators, faculty, and advisors at schools of nursing, with recommendations for incoming nursing students. Comparing these findings to those at a community college or private four-year college would add to the literature on how student employment affects academic achievement. Key words: students, employment, academics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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