2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159065
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Further Development of the Family Caregiving Skill Profile
Abstract:
Further Development of the Family Caregiving Skill Profile
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Schumacher, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-2092
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Stewart, PhD, Professor; Patricia G. Archbold, DNSc, RN, Professor; and Susan M. Beidler, PhD, ARNP, Assistant Professor
Family caregiving during cancer treatment requires complex skills, including symptom management, decision-making, psycho-motor, interpersonal, and system-level skills. Helping families develop caregiving skill is an important nursing intervention that ideally is based on systematic assessment of a caregiver's current skill level. However, research-based assessment tools are lacking. A new instrument, called the Family Caregiving Skill Profile (FCSP), was developed to fill this gap. Role transition theory provides the theoretical perspective for this research. The transition into the family caregiving role requires new skills. Assessment of skill development needs by nurses knowledgeable about the demands of the role may facilitate role transition. The FCSP was based on an earlier qualitative concept development study. Initial psychometric testing (reported previously) resulted in a revision of items, subscales, scoring, and administration. The purpose of the current study was to test the revised FCSP with a sample of 50 family caregivers of adults receiving cancer chemotherapy. To administer the revised FCSP, a semi-structured interview is conducted with family caregivers (and patients if they choose to participate). Trained raters rate the interview data for the presence of 68 indicators of skill across 9 subscales. Subscale scores provide a profile of skills. Internal consistency coefficients for 8 subscales ranged from 0.78-0.88. Concurrent validity was assessed with multiple caregiver and patient self-report variables and with data abstracted from patients' medical records. The results suggest that an "objective" rating of caregiving skill taps a dimension of caregiving that complements caregiver self-report and that caregiving skill may be related to patient outcomes. Further testing with a larger sample is needed. An instrument that generates a profile of caregiving skills could allow clinicians to pinpoint areas of caregiver strength and areas of limited skill in which coaching for skill development is needed. Funding provided by NINR - R01 NR05126
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFurther Development of the Family Caregiving Skill Profileen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159065-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Further Development of the Family Caregiving Skill Profile</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schumacher, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-2092</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschumacher@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Stewart, PhD, Professor; Patricia G. Archbold, DNSc, RN, Professor; and Susan M. Beidler, PhD, ARNP, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family caregiving during cancer treatment requires complex skills, including symptom management, decision-making, psycho-motor, interpersonal, and system-level skills. Helping families develop caregiving skill is an important nursing intervention that ideally is based on systematic assessment of a caregiver's current skill level. However, research-based assessment tools are lacking. A new instrument, called the Family Caregiving Skill Profile (FCSP), was developed to fill this gap. Role transition theory provides the theoretical perspective for this research. The transition into the family caregiving role requires new skills. Assessment of skill development needs by nurses knowledgeable about the demands of the role may facilitate role transition. The FCSP was based on an earlier qualitative concept development study. Initial psychometric testing (reported previously) resulted in a revision of items, subscales, scoring, and administration. The purpose of the current study was to test the revised FCSP with a sample of 50 family caregivers of adults receiving cancer chemotherapy. To administer the revised FCSP, a semi-structured interview is conducted with family caregivers (and patients if they choose to participate). Trained raters rate the interview data for the presence of 68 indicators of skill across 9 subscales. Subscale scores provide a profile of skills. Internal consistency coefficients for 8 subscales ranged from 0.78-0.88. Concurrent validity was assessed with multiple caregiver and patient self-report variables and with data abstracted from patients' medical records. The results suggest that an &quot;objective&quot; rating of caregiving skill taps a dimension of caregiving that complements caregiver self-report and that caregiving skill may be related to patient outcomes. Further testing with a larger sample is needed. An instrument that generates a profile of caregiving skills could allow clinicians to pinpoint areas of caregiver strength and areas of limited skill in which coaching for skill development is needed. Funding provided by NINR - R01 NR05126</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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