2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159066
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Common Sense Information Needs among Residents in an Arsenic Advisory Area
Abstract:
Common Sense Information Needs among Residents in an Arsenic Advisory Area
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Severtson, Dolores, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:SON - H6/295 CSC, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5311
Co-Authors:Laurie Hartjes, MS, APRN, BC, PNP, Predoctoral Student; T. Martin Salas; and Linda Baumann, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor
The arsenic drinking water standard was lowered from 50 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) in 2001. This change is prompting increased private well testing and the need to meet private well users' information needs. Public health departments typically work with natural resources agencies to provide information about managing private wells to provide safe drinking water. Few studies have explored the information needs of private well users and none have examined how a revised safety standard influences these needs. The purpose of this study was to explore information needs about the risk of arsenic contaminated well water among residents living in an arsenic advisory area where 23.5% of private wells were > 10 ppb arsenic. State and county public health and natural resources agencies collaborated with town governments to offer an educational arsenic well testing program (WTP) to encourage well testing and promote informed decisions. A theory-based evaluation of the WTP applied the common sense model (CSM) to explore information use, understandings of, and responses to arsenic contaminated well water. The CSM has been used to understand responses to illness threats but we applied it to an environmental threat. A survey consisting of 100 close-ended and 8 open-ended 'optional' survey items was mailed to 1496 residents in 17 WTP towns; 1233 (82.4%) participated in the evaluation study. NUDIST6 was used to code and analyze written comments in response to the open-ended question "What I would really like to know is...". 356 (29%) participants responded to this question. CSM concepts were used to code the content of the written responses into six cognitive dimensions (identity, cause, timeline, consequences, control, uncertainty) and an affective component. Analyses will explore the content of comments and patterns among concepts. Study results and implications for both theory and education programs will be reported. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommon Sense Information Needs among Residents in an Arsenic Advisory Areaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159066-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Common Sense Information Needs among Residents in an Arsenic Advisory Area</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Severtson, Dolores, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - H6/295 CSC, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">djsevert@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laurie Hartjes, MS, APRN, BC, PNP, Predoctoral Student; T. Martin Salas; and Linda Baumann, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The arsenic drinking water standard was lowered from 50 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) in 2001. This change is prompting increased private well testing and the need to meet private well users' information needs. Public health departments typically work with natural resources agencies to provide information about managing private wells to provide safe drinking water. Few studies have explored the information needs of private well users and none have examined how a revised safety standard influences these needs. The purpose of this study was to explore information needs about the risk of arsenic contaminated well water among residents living in an arsenic advisory area where 23.5% of private wells were &gt; 10 ppb arsenic. State and county public health and natural resources agencies collaborated with town governments to offer an educational arsenic well testing program (WTP) to encourage well testing and promote informed decisions. A theory-based evaluation of the WTP applied the common sense model (CSM) to explore information use, understandings of, and responses to arsenic contaminated well water. The CSM has been used to understand responses to illness threats but we applied it to an environmental threat. A survey consisting of 100 close-ended and 8 open-ended 'optional' survey items was mailed to 1496 residents in 17 WTP towns; 1233 (82.4%) participated in the evaluation study. NUDIST6 was used to code and analyze written comments in response to the open-ended question &quot;What I would really like to know is...&quot;. 356 (29%) participants responded to this question. CSM concepts were used to code the content of the written responses into six cognitive dimensions (identity, cause, timeline, consequences, control, uncertainty) and an affective component. Analyses will explore the content of comments and patterns among concepts. Study results and implications for both theory and education programs will be reported. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.