Teenage mothers and their teen children's fertility: What goes around comes around?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159067
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teenage mothers and their teen children's fertility: What goes around comes around?
Abstract:
Teenage mothers and their teen children's fertility: What goes around comes around?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:SmithBattle, Lee, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline St., St. Louis,, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8980
Teen mothers' children are considered high risk for early childbearing. A longitudinal, multigenerational study of teen mothering provided an opportunity to examine family practices and patterns that shape teenagers' fertility. All 5 studies in the series were based on the phenomenology of everyday practices and assumed a dialogical view of the self. Sixteen families were first interviewed in 1988-1989 and re-interviewed at 4 year intervals over a 16 year period. Ten families participated at Time 5: the total sample (n=27) included 10 mothers and one partner, 10 of their parents, and 6 first-born (index) children of the women. Families were black or non-Latina white and varied on socioeconomic status. Mothers ranged in age from 31-35 years and index children from 16-17 years. Six in-depth interviews elicited the perspectives of parents, their parents, and index children. Data were analyzed using interpretive strategies. All but one of the mothers had discussed sex openly with their children; all condemned early childbearing. Four of the index children were known by their mothers to be sexually active. One daughter had become pregnant and one son had impregnated 4 girls but no births had occurred. This analysis describes the parenting practices that distinguish between families with and without a teen pregnancy. Parenting practices among the two families with a pregnancy contributed to a foreshortened sense of future that led both teens to drift into pregnancy. Families avoiding teen pregnancy described practices that supported a promising future for their children. Both patterns are illustrated with exemplars and paradigm cases. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings for adolescent health, sex education policy, and future research are also presented. Funded by Sigma Theta Tau International. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeenage mothers and their teen children's fertility: What goes around comes around?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159067-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teenage mothers and their teen children's fertility: What goes around comes around?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">SmithBattle, Lee, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline St., St. Louis,, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8980</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smithli@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Teen mothers' children are considered high risk for early childbearing. A longitudinal, multigenerational study of teen mothering provided an opportunity to examine family practices and patterns that shape teenagers' fertility. All 5 studies in the series were based on the phenomenology of everyday practices and assumed a dialogical view of the self. Sixteen families were first interviewed in 1988-1989 and re-interviewed at 4 year intervals over a 16 year period. Ten families participated at Time 5: the total sample (n=27) included 10 mothers and one partner, 10 of their parents, and 6 first-born (index) children of the women. Families were black or non-Latina white and varied on socioeconomic status. Mothers ranged in age from 31-35 years and index children from 16-17 years. Six in-depth interviews elicited the perspectives of parents, their parents, and index children. Data were analyzed using interpretive strategies. All but one of the mothers had discussed sex openly with their children; all condemned early childbearing. Four of the index children were known by their mothers to be sexually active. One daughter had become pregnant and one son had impregnated 4 girls but no births had occurred. This analysis describes the parenting practices that distinguish between families with and without a teen pregnancy. Parenting practices among the two families with a pregnancy contributed to a foreshortened sense of future that led both teens to drift into pregnancy. Families avoiding teen pregnancy described practices that supported a promising future for their children. Both patterns are illustrated with exemplars and paradigm cases. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings for adolescent health, sex education policy, and future research are also presented. Funded by Sigma Theta Tau International. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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