2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159069
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weight, Exercise & Health: The Children's Perspective
Abstract:
Weight, Exercise & Health: The Children's Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Snethen, Julia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211-3060, USA
Contact Telephone:414-229-5505
Co-Authors:Marion E Broome, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean
Limited information is available on children's perspectives about their weight, exercise, and health. Understanding the children's perspectives could further the development of effective weight management strategies for children. The purpose of this investigation was to identify children's perspective of their weight, exercise, and health status. Participants for this investigation were 17 children between 8 and 12 years of age, whose body mass index was at or above the 95th percentile for age and gender. Semi-structured audio-taped interviews were conducted with participants, and transcribed verbatim for qualitative analysis. Data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. The four themes that emerged were: Mind-body Disconnect; Body Image Incongruence; Social Importance; and Exercise Comprehension. Participants were able to describe which foods were nutritious. However, information from the participants suggests that strategies need to be developed to help children make the connection between what they know is good nutrition, and their actual dietary intake. The children were also aware that exercise is important for good health, but their actual exercise was limited. The children did identify ways they could increase their physical activity levels. However, there was a clear lack of understanding about what might constitute exercise outside of gym class. Future research should focus on the identification of strategies to help children incorporate good nutrition and increased physical activities into their daily lives. Research needs to also explore environmental and familial factors that my influence dietary intake and physical activity in children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeight, Exercise & Health: The Children's Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159069-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Weight, Exercise &amp; Health: The Children's Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snethen, Julia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211-3060, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-229-5505</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">julia@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion E Broome, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Limited information is available on children's perspectives about their weight, exercise, and health. Understanding the children's perspectives could further the development of effective weight management strategies for children. The purpose of this investigation was to identify children's perspective of their weight, exercise, and health status. Participants for this investigation were 17 children between 8 and 12 years of age, whose body mass index was at or above the 95th percentile for age and gender. Semi-structured audio-taped interviews were conducted with participants, and transcribed verbatim for qualitative analysis. Data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. The four themes that emerged were: Mind-body Disconnect; Body Image Incongruence; Social Importance; and Exercise Comprehension. Participants were able to describe which foods were nutritious. However, information from the participants suggests that strategies need to be developed to help children make the connection between what they know is good nutrition, and their actual dietary intake. The children were also aware that exercise is important for good health, but their actual exercise was limited. The children did identify ways they could increase their physical activity levels. However, there was a clear lack of understanding about what might constitute exercise outside of gym class. Future research should focus on the identification of strategies to help children incorporate good nutrition and increased physical activities into their daily lives. Research needs to also explore environmental and familial factors that my influence dietary intake and physical activity in children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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