2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159075
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Gene Silencing Technique to Understand Senile Plaque Formation
Abstract:
Using Gene Silencing Technique to Understand Senile Plaque Formation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sutherland, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing - M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:(312) 355-0282
Co-Authors:Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant; and Tess L. Briones, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
The hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the formation of senile plaques. Senile plaque formation occurs in brain regions involved in memory processing, thus the most common cognitive impairment seen in AD is memory impairment. Senile plaques originate from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (¯APP), which may be cleaved (split) by different enzymes in several ways. Under normal conditions, ¯APP is cleaved by the alpha secretase enzyme however, in certain pathological conditions, ¯APP is cleaved by the beta and gamma secretase enzymes resulting in the formation of senile plaques. The aim of the present study is to determine how the activity of the alpha secretase enzyme can be enhanced so that formation of senile plaques is minimized. Using a state-of-the-art technique called RNA interference (RNAi), we are currently examining alpha secretase activity in cultured brain cells. RNAi is a technique that silences expression of the alpha secretase gene to systematically study its role in preventing senile plaque formation. Successful gene silencing will result in the inability of the gene to produce its encoded protein; hence, we are performing quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis to validate our results. qRT-PCR will provide information on the degree of gene silencing while Western blots will provide information on protein expression. Results of successful gene silencing in cultured brain cells will give us an understanding of how alpha secretase activity may be enhanced so that senile plaque formation can be minimized. Furthermore, in vivo studies in the future using RNAi to study animal models and aging will provide us with information on how environmental stimulation (exercise, dietary modulation and/or multi-sensory stimulation) may be able to modulate alpha secretase activity so that the incidence of developing age-related AD is reduced. (Funded in part by NIH NR007666 and Deans Fund UIC College of Nursing).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Gene Silencing Technique to Understand Senile Plaque Formationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159075-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Gene Silencing Technique to Understand Senile Plaque Formation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sutherland, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing - M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(312) 355-0282</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksutherl@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant; and Tess L. Briones, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the formation of senile plaques. Senile plaque formation occurs in brain regions involved in memory processing, thus the most common cognitive impairment seen in AD is memory impairment. Senile plaques originate from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (&macr;APP), which may be cleaved (split) by different enzymes in several ways. Under normal conditions, &macr;APP is cleaved by the alpha secretase enzyme however, in certain pathological conditions, &macr;APP is cleaved by the beta and gamma secretase enzymes resulting in the formation of senile plaques. The aim of the present study is to determine how the activity of the alpha secretase enzyme can be enhanced so that formation of senile plaques is minimized. Using a state-of-the-art technique called RNA interference (RNAi), we are currently examining alpha secretase activity in cultured brain cells. RNAi is a technique that silences expression of the alpha secretase gene to systematically study its role in preventing senile plaque formation. Successful gene silencing will result in the inability of the gene to produce its encoded protein; hence, we are performing quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis to validate our results. qRT-PCR will provide information on the degree of gene silencing while Western blots will provide information on protein expression. Results of successful gene silencing in cultured brain cells will give us an understanding of how alpha secretase activity may be enhanced so that senile plaque formation can be minimized. Furthermore, in vivo studies in the future using RNAi to study animal models and aging will provide us with information on how environmental stimulation (exercise, dietary modulation and/or multi-sensory stimulation) may be able to modulate alpha secretase activity so that the incidence of developing age-related AD is reduced. (Funded in part by NIH NR007666 and Deans Fund UIC College of Nursing).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:40:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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