Nursing Students' Use of PDAs to Decrease Preparation Time and Improve Medication Administration Knowledge and Critical Thinking in the Critical Care Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159082
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' Use of PDAs to Decrease Preparation Time and Improve Medication Administration Knowledge and Critical Thinking in the Critical Care Setting
Abstract:
Nursing Students' Use of PDAs to Decrease Preparation Time and Improve Medication Administration Knowledge and Critical Thinking in the Critical Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Voss, Jo, PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA
Contact Telephone:605-394-6616
Co-Authors:Karyl Blaseg, MSN, RN, BC, Instructor
While studies have been done among physicians' and medical students' use of personal digital assistants (PDAs), insufficient research has been published related to nurses' and nursing students' use of PDAs in the clinical setting. It was unknown if technology (such as PDAs) can save time and improve critical thinking with immediate access to clinical information that is required to provide care for critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of PDAs compared to traditional methods (textbooks) would decrease time in preparation for clinical experiences, would improve medication administration knowledge, and would improve critical thinking. The conceptual framework for this study was based on the assimilation theory of learning. An experimental repeated measures two group design was used to study the effect of PDAs on preparation time, medication administration knowledge, and critical thinking in senior nursing students in the critical care setting over a period of six hospital clinical experiences. Twenty-five nursing students were randomly assigned to either the PDA group or control group. All students recorded in a log the amount of time used for clinical preparation and completion of concept maps (preparation time). Clinical instructors assigned students a score at the conclusion of each clinical experience related to medication administration knowledge. In addition, the investigators completed an evaluation of concept maps by assigning scores based on identification of concepts and appropriateness of conceptual links between concepts to measure critical thinking. Means and standard deviations were compared for both groups over the six time periods for preparation time, medication administration knowledge, and critical thinking scores. Although not statistically significant, the students with PDAs produced more complete concept maps (evidence of critical thinking) with less preparation time and demonstrated more knowledge about medications. Nursing students benefited from PDA technology in the critical care setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' Use of PDAs to Decrease Preparation Time and Improve Medication Administration Knowledge and Critical Thinking in the Critical Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159082-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' Use of PDAs to Decrease Preparation Time and Improve Medication Administration Knowledge and Critical Thinking in the Critical Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Voss, Jo, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605-394-6616</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jo_Voss@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karyl Blaseg, MSN, RN, BC, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While studies have been done among physicians' and medical students' use of personal digital assistants (PDAs), insufficient research has been published related to nurses' and nursing students' use of PDAs in the clinical setting. It was unknown if technology (such as PDAs) can save time and improve critical thinking with immediate access to clinical information that is required to provide care for critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of PDAs compared to traditional methods (textbooks) would decrease time in preparation for clinical experiences, would improve medication administration knowledge, and would improve critical thinking. The conceptual framework for this study was based on the assimilation theory of learning. An experimental repeated measures two group design was used to study the effect of PDAs on preparation time, medication administration knowledge, and critical thinking in senior nursing students in the critical care setting over a period of six hospital clinical experiences. Twenty-five nursing students were randomly assigned to either the PDA group or control group. All students recorded in a log the amount of time used for clinical preparation and completion of concept maps (preparation time). Clinical instructors assigned students a score at the conclusion of each clinical experience related to medication administration knowledge. In addition, the investigators completed an evaluation of concept maps by assigning scores based on identification of concepts and appropriateness of conceptual links between concepts to measure critical thinking. Means and standard deviations were compared for both groups over the six time periods for preparation time, medication administration knowledge, and critical thinking scores. Although not statistically significant, the students with PDAs produced more complete concept maps (evidence of critical thinking) with less preparation time and demonstrated more knowledge about medications. Nursing students benefited from PDA technology in the critical care setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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