2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159083
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New Perspectives: Caring for Geriatric Patients with Delirium and Dementia
Abstract:
New Perspectives: Caring for Geriatric Patients with Delirium and Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wamsley, Cindy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Bryan LGH Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 2300 South 16th Street, Lincoln, NE, 68502, USA
Contact Telephone:402-481-4940
Co-Authors:Kelli K. Schreiner, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist
Nurses working in orthopedic units frequently care for patients with symptoms of delirium or dementia. The increased time and energy needed to care for these patients may strongly affect the resources of the staff nurses. This often leads to feelings of frustration for the nurse and poor outcomes for the patient and family. A grounded theory qualitative research study was performed to explore nursing staff members' perceived experiences when caring for patients with cognitive impairment. Interviews were conducted with 13 orthopedic registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and certified nursing assistants. Through open-ended interview questions, the participants' personal experiences when caring for patients suffering from symptoms of delirium and dementia were shared. The participants' abilities to provide adequate care and attention to these patients were explored. The resulting narratives were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Three themes emerged: 1) frustration with the provided care; 2) lack of knowledge about the needs of patients with delirium and dementia; 3) hospital environment concerns. The theme of ôfrustration with the provided careö included the participants' feelings of guilt and inadequacy when they were unable to calm and care for these patients. The participants discussed their dissatisfaction with their work situation when encountering patients with delirium and dementia. Within the theme of ôlack of knowledgeö it was evident that participants were unacquainted with the holistic clinical view of delirium and dementia. Disruptive noise, dull lighting, and increased sensory impairments of the elderly were common elements frequently associated with ôhospital environment concerns.ö Overall, this study has provided further insight and knowledge in caring for those with delirium and dementia. This will enhance nursing staff perspectives and increase job satisfaction while improving the quality of life and dignity for the elderly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew Perspectives: Caring for Geriatric Patients with Delirium and Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159083-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">New Perspectives: Caring for Geriatric Patients with Delirium and Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wamsley, Cindy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bryan LGH Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 2300 South 16th Street, Lincoln, NE, 68502, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-481-4940</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindy.wamsley@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kelli K. Schreiner, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses working in orthopedic units frequently care for patients with symptoms of delirium or dementia. The increased time and energy needed to care for these patients may strongly affect the resources of the staff nurses. This often leads to feelings of frustration for the nurse and poor outcomes for the patient and family. A grounded theory qualitative research study was performed to explore nursing staff members' perceived experiences when caring for patients with cognitive impairment. Interviews were conducted with 13 orthopedic registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and certified nursing assistants. Through open-ended interview questions, the participants' personal experiences when caring for patients suffering from symptoms of delirium and dementia were shared. The participants' abilities to provide adequate care and attention to these patients were explored. The resulting narratives were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Three themes emerged: 1) frustration with the provided care; 2) lack of knowledge about the needs of patients with delirium and dementia; 3) hospital environment concerns. The theme of &ocirc;frustration with the provided care&ouml; included the participants' feelings of guilt and inadequacy when they were unable to calm and care for these patients. The participants discussed their dissatisfaction with their work situation when encountering patients with delirium and dementia. Within the theme of &ocirc;lack of knowledge&ouml; it was evident that participants were unacquainted with the holistic clinical view of delirium and dementia. Disruptive noise, dull lighting, and increased sensory impairments of the elderly were common elements frequently associated with &ocirc;hospital environment concerns.&ouml; Overall, this study has provided further insight and knowledge in caring for those with delirium and dementia. This will enhance nursing staff perspectives and increase job satisfaction while improving the quality of life and dignity for the elderly.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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