Evaluating Effectiveness of an Inpatient Nurse-Directed Smoking Cessation Program in a Small Community Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159087
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating Effectiveness of an Inpatient Nurse-Directed Smoking Cessation Program in a Small Community Hospital
Abstract:
Evaluating Effectiveness of an Inpatient Nurse-Directed Smoking Cessation Program in a Small Community Hospital
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gies, Cheryl
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3015 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH, 43614-5803, USA
Contact Telephone:419 383-6736
Co-Authors:Debra D. Buchman, PhD, RN; Janet Robinson, PhD, RN; and Dianne Smolen, PhD, RN
The impact of smoking on health is well known and there is strong evidence that individuals have positive outcomes when tobacco cessation interventions are implemented by nurses in clinical settings. The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured, nurse-directed smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized adult smokers. The study used a quasi-experimental, prospective, longitudinal design with Pender's Revised Health Promotion Model as the conceptual framework. The sample included 68 hospitalized adults who were assigned to a control or intervention group. The control group received smoking cessation literature (standard of care). The intervention group received the smoking cessation literature and the nursing intervention. In addition, participants in the intervention group were randomized to subgroups for follow-up by the nurse after discharge. The first subgroup received one phone call and the second subgroup received four phone calls. Smoking status for all participants was assessed at baseline and at twelve weeks by self-report and carbon monoxide monitoring. Fifty-five participants completed the study. Smokers receiving the nurse-directed intervention were more likely to be tobacco abstinent at three months (n=17, 55%) than smokers in the control group who received standard care (n=5, 21%). There was no statistically significant difference in tobacco abstinence between the one follow-up call group and the four follow-up call group. However, for the participants who changed from non-smoking at one week to smoking at twelve weeks, the additional phone calls appeared to delay the relapse. Comparing participants smoking at twelve weeks to participants who were not smoking at twelve weeks, regardless of intervention, smokers were significantly more likely to live with another smoker. Implications for practice and future research include testing family-focused interventions and evaluation of a low intensity, sustained relapse prevention program over a longer period of time. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating Effectiveness of an Inpatient Nurse-Directed Smoking Cessation Program in a Small Community Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159087-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluating Effectiveness of an Inpatient Nurse-Directed Smoking Cessation Program in a Small Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gies, Cheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3015 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH, 43614-5803, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419 383-6736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cgies@mco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra D. Buchman, PhD, RN; Janet Robinson, PhD, RN; and Dianne Smolen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The impact of smoking on health is well known and there is strong evidence that individuals have positive outcomes when tobacco cessation interventions are implemented by nurses in clinical settings. The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured, nurse-directed smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized adult smokers. The study used a quasi-experimental, prospective, longitudinal design with Pender's Revised Health Promotion Model as the conceptual framework. The sample included 68 hospitalized adults who were assigned to a control or intervention group. The control group received smoking cessation literature (standard of care). The intervention group received the smoking cessation literature and the nursing intervention. In addition, participants in the intervention group were randomized to subgroups for follow-up by the nurse after discharge. The first subgroup received one phone call and the second subgroup received four phone calls. Smoking status for all participants was assessed at baseline and at twelve weeks by self-report and carbon monoxide monitoring. Fifty-five participants completed the study. Smokers receiving the nurse-directed intervention were more likely to be tobacco abstinent at three months (n=17, 55%) than smokers in the control group who received standard care (n=5, 21%). There was no statistically significant difference in tobacco abstinence between the one follow-up call group and the four follow-up call group. However, for the participants who changed from non-smoking at one week to smoking at twelve weeks, the additional phone calls appeared to delay the relapse. Comparing participants smoking at twelve weeks to participants who were not smoking at twelve weeks, regardless of intervention, smokers were significantly more likely to live with another smoker. Implications for practice and future research include testing family-focused interventions and evaluation of a low intensity, sustained relapse prevention program over a longer period of time. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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