The impact of uncertainty, social support, and prenatal coping on the psychological well-being of women with high-risk pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159088
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The impact of uncertainty, social support, and prenatal coping on the psychological well-being of women with high-risk pregnancy
Abstract:
The impact of uncertainty, social support, and prenatal coping on the psychological well-being of women with high-risk pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Maternal Child Nursing, 845 S Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-8051
Co-Authors:Sue Penckofer, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research; Marcia Maurer, PhD, RN, Dean; and Fred B. Bryant, PhD, Professor
This study examined psychosocial issues related to high-risk
pregnancy. In 2002, approximately 650,000 of the 4,021,726 live births in
the United States were affected by high-risk pregnancy (National Center
for Health Statistics, 2003). High-risk pregnancy places both a physical
and psychological burden on women, threatens maternal and/ or fetal
health, and heralds a time of increased stress for these women. The
overall purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of
situational factors of uncertainty and social support on psychological
well-being of high-risk pregnant women were mediated by prenatal coping.
The Transactional model of Lazarus and Folkman (1984) guided this study.
This was a cross-sectional, correlational design that examined the
relationship among uncertainty, social support, prenatal coping, and
psychological well-being. The convenience sample consisted of 105
high-risk pregnant women 18-34 years of age. Data were collected by a set
of questionnaires. The major findings of the study are as follows: (1)
Women reported low levels of uncertainty, moderate levels of distress, and
high levels of social support. Prayer was the most frequently used coping
strategy, whereas avoidance was the strategy used least frequently. (2)
High-risk pregnant women who reported higher levels of uncertainty also
reported less social support, more distress, more use of avoidance and
less positive interpretation compared with women with lower levels of
uncertainty. Women who used positive interpretation had less distress
whereas those who used avoidance reported more distress. (3) The modified
path model showed a good fit with the data. Avoidance significantly
mediated the effects of uncertainty on psychological well-being. Social
support had a significant direct effect on preparation for motherhood.
This study provided a better understanding of the experience of high-risk
pregnant women. The results of this study may help perinatal nurses
understand the complexity of high-risk pregnancy and how women are
affected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of uncertainty, social support, and prenatal coping on the psychological well-being of women with high-risk pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159088-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The impact of uncertainty, social support, and prenatal coping on the psychological well-being of women with high-risk pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giurgescu, Carmen, PhD, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal Child Nursing, 845 S Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-8051</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carmeng7030@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Penckofer, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research; Marcia Maurer, PhD, RN, Dean; and Fred B. Bryant, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined psychosocial issues related to high-risk <br/> pregnancy. In 2002, approximately 650,000 of the 4,021,726 live births in <br/> the United States were affected by high-risk pregnancy (National Center <br/> for Health Statistics, 2003). High-risk pregnancy places both a physical <br/> and psychological burden on women, threatens maternal and/ or fetal <br/> health, and heralds a time of increased stress for these women. The <br/> overall purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of <br/> situational factors of uncertainty and social support on psychological <br/> well-being of high-risk pregnant women were mediated by prenatal coping. <br/> The Transactional model of Lazarus and Folkman (1984) guided this study. <br/> This was a cross-sectional, correlational design that examined the <br/> relationship among uncertainty, social support, prenatal coping, and <br/> psychological well-being. The convenience sample consisted of 105 <br/> high-risk pregnant women 18-34 years of age. Data were collected by a set <br/> of questionnaires. The major findings of the study are as follows: (1) <br/> Women reported low levels of uncertainty, moderate levels of distress, and <br/> high levels of social support. Prayer was the most frequently used coping <br/> strategy, whereas avoidance was the strategy used least frequently. (2) <br/> High-risk pregnant women who reported higher levels of uncertainty also <br/> reported less social support, more distress, more use of avoidance and <br/> less positive interpretation compared with women with lower levels of <br/> uncertainty. Women who used positive interpretation had less distress <br/> whereas those who used avoidance reported more distress. (3) The modified <br/> path model showed a good fit with the data. Avoidance significantly <br/> mediated the effects of uncertainty on psychological well-being. Social <br/> support had a significant direct effect on preparation for motherhood. <br/> This study provided a better understanding of the experience of high-risk <br/> pregnant women. The results of this study may help perinatal nurses <br/> understand the complexity of high-risk pregnancy and how women are <br/> affected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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