2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159089
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Dopamine on Diaphragm Apoptosis
Abstract:
Effect of Dopamine on Diaphragm Apoptosis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Goodyear-Bruch, Caryl
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Allied Health, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-6612
Co-Authors:Jay Jegethesan; Richard Clancy, Emeritus Professor; and Janet Pierce, Associate Professor
Apoptosis, as a consequence of free radical damage, may contribute to decreased diaphragm muscle performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if dopamine prevents diaphragm apoptosis by scavenging free radicals. Using an in-vivo model, diaphragm fatigue in anesthetized rats was produced using inspiratory resistance loading (IRL) for 45 minutes (control group). With administration of dopamine (2 ¦g/kg/min) for 55 minutes before and during IRL, diaphragm fatigue was prevented and blood flow increased. At the end of each experiment, the diaphragm was excised and apoptosis measured using fluorescent microscopy. In the control group, the percent of apoptotic nuclei (59%) was significantly greater than the dopamine group (16%), p < 0.0001. Dopamine either depressed apoptosis by scavenging free radicals or by decreasing free radical formation by increasing blood flow. Therefore, further experiments were performed using an in-vitro model at various oxygen (O2) concentrations (95%, 21%, 10%), where diaphragm fatigue was elicited using electrical stimulation in isolated diaphragm muscle. Subtetanic muscle contractions were produced for 10 minutes followed by a recovery period (40 minutes) in baths with either kreb or dopamine (100 ¦M). After each experiment, the diaphragms were analyzed for apoptosis. In 95% O2, no differences were observed in the number of apoptotic nuclei between control and dopamine groups. At 21% O2, apoptotic nuclei in the control group (37%) was significantly higher than the dopamine group (7%), p=0.001. For 10% O2, apoptotic nuclei in the control group (43%) was higher than the dopamine group (8 %). These data suggest that dopamine prevents apoptosis at lower oxygen states by scavenging free radicals. Critical care nurses frequently encounter ventilator dependent patients whose diaphragm performance is suboptimal. Because dopamine is frequently administered to critically ill patients, nurses may begin to see dopamine used to improve diaphragm muscle performance. (NIH, RO1 NR05317-01A1) (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Dopamine on Diaphragm Apoptosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159089-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Dopamine on Diaphragm Apoptosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goodyear-Bruch, Caryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Allied Health, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-6612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cgoodyearbruch@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jay Jegethesan; Richard Clancy, Emeritus Professor; and Janet Pierce, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Apoptosis, as a consequence of free radical damage, may contribute to decreased diaphragm muscle performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if dopamine prevents diaphragm apoptosis by scavenging free radicals. Using an in-vivo model, diaphragm fatigue in anesthetized rats was produced using inspiratory resistance loading (IRL) for 45 minutes (control group). With administration of dopamine (2 &brvbar;g/kg/min) for 55 minutes before and during IRL, diaphragm fatigue was prevented and blood flow increased. At the end of each experiment, the diaphragm was excised and apoptosis measured using fluorescent microscopy. In the control group, the percent of apoptotic nuclei (59%) was significantly greater than the dopamine group (16%), p &lt; 0.0001. Dopamine either depressed apoptosis by scavenging free radicals or by decreasing free radical formation by increasing blood flow. Therefore, further experiments were performed using an in-vitro model at various oxygen (O2) concentrations (95%, 21%, 10%), where diaphragm fatigue was elicited using electrical stimulation in isolated diaphragm muscle. Subtetanic muscle contractions were produced for 10 minutes followed by a recovery period (40 minutes) in baths with either kreb or dopamine (100 &brvbar;M). After each experiment, the diaphragms were analyzed for apoptosis. In 95% O2, no differences were observed in the number of apoptotic nuclei between control and dopamine groups. At 21% O2, apoptotic nuclei in the control group (37%) was significantly higher than the dopamine group (7%), p=0.001. For 10% O2, apoptotic nuclei in the control group (43%) was higher than the dopamine group (8 %). These data suggest that dopamine prevents apoptosis at lower oxygen states by scavenging free radicals. Critical care nurses frequently encounter ventilator dependent patients whose diaphragm performance is suboptimal. Because dopamine is frequently administered to critically ill patients, nurses may begin to see dopamine used to improve diaphragm muscle performance. (NIH, RO1 NR05317-01A1) (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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