The Relationship of Magnesium and Phosphorus to Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality in the Chronically Critically Ill

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159090
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Magnesium and Phosphorus to Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality in the Chronically Critically Ill
Abstract:
The Relationship of Magnesium and Phosphorus to Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality in the Chronically Critically Ill
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:Critical Care Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland,, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-2520
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Higgins, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; Amy R. Lipson, PhD, Project Director; and Nutthita Petchprapai, RN, MSN, Research Assistant
Problem: Abnormal levels of serum electrolytes such as magnesium (Mg)
and phosphorus cause a number of clinical problems in intensive care unit
(ICU) patients, including cardiac, neurological, and neuromuscular
disorders. Purpose & Methods: As part of a larger federally funded study
(NINR-05005), a prospective, longitudinal analysis was conducted to
examine serum total magnesium and phosphorus levels and their
relationships to mortality, episodes of mechanical ventilation (MV), and
the length of MV in the chronically critically ill (CCI). Weekly
laboratory data were collected throughout the subject's hospital stay.
Results: A convenience sample of 400 adults (223 women, 177 men) was
followed for 5 weeks beginning with their third day of intubation.
Subjects were primarily Caucasian (61.3%) and single (54.0%). Mean age=62
years, mean APACHE III=77, mean length of MV=11 days, mean episodes of
MV=1.2, and mortality rate=38.8%. Seventy-four percent of the patients
received either enteral or parenteral nutrition therapy during the study
period. The mean serum total magnesium and phosphorus levels were 1.9
mEq/L (range 1.5-2.4) and 3.8 mg/dl (range 2.3-5.6). On the third day
intubation, 16 patients (4.1%) had hypomagnesaemia and 62 (15.9%) had
hypermagnesaemia; 99 patients (27.0%) were hypophosphataemia and 61
(16.7%) were hyperphosphataemia. Patients with hypomagnesaemia had more
episodes of MV than those with normal Mg level (t=- 2.4, p=.02). In
addition, patients with hypermagnesaemia were more likely to die than
those with normal Mg levels (x2=3.5, p=.06). Four variables:
hypermagnesaemia, hyperphosphataemia, APACHE III, and admission albumin,
predicted 9% of the mortality in this patient population (p=0.001).
Conclusion: Further investigation, which includes data about type and
amount of supplemental feedings, is needed to further explore the role of
magnesium and phosphorus in CCI morbidity and mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Magnesium and Phosphorus to Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality in the Chronically Critically Illen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159090-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Magnesium and Phosphorus to Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality in the Chronically Critically Ill</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Critical Care Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland,, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-2520</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sxg90@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Higgins, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; Amy R. Lipson, PhD, Project Director; and Nutthita Petchprapai, RN, MSN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Abnormal levels of serum electrolytes such as magnesium (Mg) <br/> and phosphorus cause a number of clinical problems in intensive care unit <br/> (ICU) patients, including cardiac, neurological, and neuromuscular <br/> disorders. Purpose &amp; Methods: As part of a larger federally funded study <br/> (NINR-05005), a prospective, longitudinal analysis was conducted to <br/> examine serum total magnesium and phosphorus levels and their <br/> relationships to mortality, episodes of mechanical ventilation (MV), and <br/> the length of MV in the chronically critically ill (CCI). Weekly <br/> laboratory data were collected throughout the subject's hospital stay. <br/> Results: A convenience sample of 400 adults (223 women, 177 men) was <br/> followed for 5 weeks beginning with their third day of intubation. <br/> Subjects were primarily Caucasian (61.3%) and single (54.0%). Mean age=62 <br/> years, mean APACHE III=77, mean length of MV=11 days, mean episodes of <br/> MV=1.2, and mortality rate=38.8%. Seventy-four percent of the patients <br/> received either enteral or parenteral nutrition therapy during the study <br/> period. The mean serum total magnesium and phosphorus levels were 1.9 <br/> mEq/L (range 1.5-2.4) and 3.8 mg/dl (range 2.3-5.6). On the third day <br/> intubation, 16 patients (4.1%) had hypomagnesaemia and 62 (15.9%) had <br/> hypermagnesaemia; 99 patients (27.0%) were hypophosphataemia and 61 <br/> (16.7%) were hyperphosphataemia. Patients with hypomagnesaemia had more <br/> episodes of MV than those with normal Mg level (t=- 2.4, p=.02). In <br/> addition, patients with hypermagnesaemia were more likely to die than <br/> those with normal Mg levels (x2=3.5, p=.06). Four variables: <br/> hypermagnesaemia, hyperphosphataemia, APACHE III, and admission albumin, <br/> predicted 9% of the mortality in this patient population (p=0.001). <br/> Conclusion: Further investigation, which includes data about type and <br/> amount of supplemental feedings, is needed to further explore the role of <br/> magnesium and phosphorus in CCI morbidity and mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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